2018-2019 University Catalog 
    
    Oct 20, 2020  
2018-2019 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Communications Sciences & Disorders

  
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    CSD 321 - Neurology, Anatomy & Physiology of the Speech & Hearing Mechanism, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSD 105  and CSD 220  
    The anatomy and physiology of normal speech production and of the hearing mechanism. Including the study of the nervous system, ear, laryngeal, respiratory and orofacial processes. Applications to disorders in speech, language and hearing will be discussed.

  
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    CSD 325 - Articulation and Phonology Disorders, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSD 105 , CSD 220  and CSD 225 
    The study of the normal aspects of articulation, speech sound acquisition, phonological awareness, and classification and factors related to speech sound disorders. Applications of this information in the assessment and remediation of speech sounds disorders in children and adults will be addressed.

  
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    CSD 334 - American Sign Language (ameslan), 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSD 134 
    A study of sign language and fingerspelling with emphasis on receptive and expressive message clarity, comprehension of AMESLAN syntax and semantics, and facility in encoding and decoding. Some attention is given to the idiomatic aspects of sign language as used by the deaf population (1400-1500 signs).

  
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    CSD 335X - Clinical Practice- Individual, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): CSD 105 ,CSD 220 ,CSD 225 , and either CSD 325  or CSD 340 . Earned grade of B- or above in CSD 235  and CSD 236  or consent of Program Director. GPA of 3.2 or above in the major or consent of Program Director. Course must be repeated if grade of C or below is earned.
    This course allows students to participate in experiential learning at the Baldwin Wallace Speech Clinic.  Students are assigned to clients receiving individual therapy sessions and work to obtain ASHA clinical hours.  Throughout this experience students are required to develop, write and execute long-term goals, short-term goals, and weekly lesson plans.  Students also write SOAP notes and reflections on his/her performance.  Students enroll in this course for two semesters and repeat the course if a grade of C or below is earned.

  
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    CSD 340 - Language Disorders, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSD 105  and CSD 220 
    The nature and characteristics of language disorders in children and adults are discussed. Including the assessment and treatment of disorders of syntax, semantics, morphology and pragmatics in all populations of language disordered children and adults.

  
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    CSD 341 - Voice and Fluency Disorders, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSD 105  and CSD 220 
    The nature and characteristics of voice and fluency disorders in children and adults are discussed, including the assessment and treatment of disorders in voice and fluency/stuttering.

  
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    CSD 359 - Faculty-Student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    CSD 420 - Audiology, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSD 105  and CSD 220 
    A study of audiology, instrumentation, diagnosis, hearing disorders and basic rehabilitation procedures for hearing impaired populations.

  
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    CSD 421 - Aural Rehabilitation, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSD 105  and CSD 220 
    A study of the historical aspects of communication intervention with people who are hearing impaired, etiologies related to hearing impairment, incorporating auditory and visual stimuli in communication, language and speech of the hearing impaired, communication methodologies, psychosocial issues related to hearing impairment, hearing aids, assistive listening devices, cochlear implants, and audiologic rehabilitation techniques across the lifespan.

  
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    CSD 435X - Clinical Practice- Group, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): CSD 105 , CSD 220 , CSD 225 , CSD 335X , and either CSD 325  or CSD 340 . Earned grade of B- or above in CSD 235  and CSD 236  or consent of Program Director. GPA of 3.2 or above in the major or consent of Program Director. Course must be repeated if grade of C or below is earned.
    This course allows students to participate in experiential learning at the Baldwin Wallace Speech Clinic or an approved offsite clinical site.  These supervised experiences allow the students to lead group therapy sessions while obtaining ASHA clinical hours.  Students are required to develop, write, and execute long-term goals, short-term goals, and session lesson plans.  Students also write clinic notes and reflections on his/her performance.  Students must repeat this course if a grade of C or below is earned.

  
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    CSD 440 - Research Methods in Communication Disorders, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSD 105  and CSD 220 ; and at least one semester of CSD 335X 
    This course provides an overview of research methodology, design considerations, and the formulation of testable research questions that are central to the study of communication disorders. Ethical issues involved in communication disorders research will also be discussed. Students will design a doable evidence-based practice research proposal by the end of this course.

  
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    CSD 459 - Faculty-Student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    CSD 477 - Capstone in Communication Disorders, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Senior status. Course must be repeated if grade is below a C.
    Students enrolled in this course will complete a portfolio, in which they are to document the knowledge and skills obtain both in and out of the classroom, during their University years. The portfolio will include a resume, cover letter, recommendations letter, letters of acceptance (graduate school or employment) completed KASA form, clinical experience documentation, reflections on academic, clinical, extracurricular involvement, and employment experiences.

  
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    CSD 510 - Child Language Disorders, 3 credit hours


    The course is designed to provide a theoretical and practical orientation to the area of child language disorders. It will provide practical applications of the principles of prevention, assessment and remediation of language disorders in children birth to 18 years. 

  
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    CSD 521 - Neurology, Anatomy & Physiology for the Speech & Hearing Mechanism, 3 credit hours


    This course will review anatomy and physiology for the speech and hearing mechanism in addition to providing an understanding of neurology for speech and language function.  Development, maturation, and function of all essential structures will be covered.

  
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    CSD 525 - Articulation & Phonology Disorders, 3 credit hours


    The study of the normal aspects of articulation, speech sound acquisition, phonological awareness, and classification and factors related to speech sound disorders.  Applications of this information in the assessment and remediation of speech sounds disorders in children and adults will be addressed.       

  
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    CSD 530 - Clinical Foundations, 3 credit hours


    This course is an overview of the practice of Speech-Language Pathology and an introduction to clinical practice.  Students will learn about ethical practice guidelines, scope of practice, HIPPA/confidentiality, clinic procedures, clinical writing (goals, lesson plans, assessments), and other topics as appropriate.     

  
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    CSD 531 - Diagnostics in Speech-Language Pathology, 1 credit hour


    Students will learn diagnostic procedures, administration guidelines, and clinical writing procedures for diagnostics/evaluations in Speech-Language Pathology.  Students will earn clock hours conducting diagnostics with a variety of patients with communication disorders across the lifespan.

  
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    CSD 534 - Augmentative & Alternative Communication, 2 credit hours


    A look at the assessment and intervention methods associated with augmentative and alternative communication (AAC).  An understanding of AAC and the language systems, continuum of AAC strategies will be developed.  Students will learn how to identify potential candidates for AAC, as well as learn evaluation techniques and intervention strategies for individuals with complex communication needs.  Students will also participate in service learning through the Baldwin Wallace Speech Clinic, off-site clinical practicum, online practice, and other relevant opportunities.

  
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    CSD 535 - Clinical Practice, 1 credit hour


    Students will participate in Clinical Practice experiences on campus at the Baldwin Wallace Speech Clinic.  Students will earn clock hours with a variety of patients with communication disorders across the lifespan.     

  
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    CSD 536 - Clinical Practice, 1 credit hour


    Students will participate in Clinical Practice experiences on campus at the Baldwin Wallace Speech Clinic or at an offsite placement.  Students will earn clock hours with a variety of patients with communication disorders across the lifespan.     

  
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    CSD 537 - Clinical Practice, 1 credit hour


    Students will participate in Clinical Practice experiences on campus at the Baldwin Wallace Speech Clinic or at an offsite placement.  Students will earn clock hours with a variety of patients with communication disorders across the lifespan.     

  
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    CSD 541 - Voice Disorders, 2 credit hours


    Causation, symptomatology, and remedial procedures of voice disorders, specific evidence-based practice procedures for both children and adults across intervention settings.     

  
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    CSD 542 - Fluency Disorders, 2 credit hours


    Causation, symptomatology, and remedial procedures of stuttering, specific evidence-based practice procedures for both children and adults across intervention settings.

  
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    CSD 550 - Integrations, 3 credit hours


    This course is designed to help link the content taught in lecture-based classes in the graduate curriculum to the clinic practicum that the student engage in every semester.  Students will participate in service learning projects designed to implement concepts, reflect on clinical experiences, discuss requirements of different clinical settings, and ethical implications of day-to-day clinical practice.  Other topics will be covered as needed.

  
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    CSD 551 - Integrations, 3 credit hours


    This course is designed to help link the content taught in lecture-based classes in the graduate curriculum to the clinic practicum that the student engage in every semester.  Students will participate in service learning projects designed to implement concepts, reflect on clinical experiences, discuss requirements of different clinical settings, and ethical implications of day-to-day clinical practice.  Other topics will be covered as needed.

  
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    CSD 552 - Integrations, 2 credit hours


    This course is designed to help link the content taught in lecture-based classes in the graduate curriculum to the clinic practicum that the student engage in every semester.  Students will participate in service learning projects designed to implement concepts, reflect on clinical experiences, discuss requirements of different clinical settings, and ethical implications of day-to-day clinical practice.  Other topics will be covered as needed.

  
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    CSD 555 - Speech-Language Pathology with Special Populations, 3 credit hours


    This course will allow students to discuss the speech-language needs of special populations.  Some disorders that will be discussed within this course include autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy, Down’s syndrome, Cleft Palate (craniofacial abnormalities), and other genetic disorders.  Diagnosis, intervention, prognosis and evidence based practice will be covered with each disorder.

  
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    CSD 560 - Foundations of EBP, 3 credit hours


    This course focuses on evidence-based practice in speech-language pathology. The class will examine research methodologies in the area of human communication development and disorders. Major emphases are placed on understanding the process of empirical research; understanding the basic concepts and methods of research; and interpreting and evaluating the quality of research articles. Students will apply the principles of research and its findings to clinical management of communication disorders on their own areas of interest.

  
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    CSD 563 - SLP 2 B in Zambia, 1 credit hour


    Speech-language pathology, audiology and elephants, OH MY! Come to Zambia and see how your class work and clinical experiences connect in a different context. Embrace Sub-Saharan Africa and learn in a new way. This is a clinical practicum and service learning opportunity where students have the opportunity to explore the field of communication sciences and disorders in Zambia.

  
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    CSD 610 - Adult Language Disorders, 3 credit hours


    The course is designed to provide a theoretical and practical orientation to the area of adult language disorders. It will provide practical applications of the principles of prevention, assessment and remediation of language disorders in adults including aphasia and acquired cognitive-communication disorders, with emphasis on cognitive-communication deficits associated with traumatic brain injury, right hemisphere damage, dementing illness, and other neurogenic conditions.

  
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    CSD 621 - Aural Rehabilitation, 2 credit hours


  
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    CSD 625 - Motor Speech Disorders & Dysphagia, 3 credit hours


    Examines the nature, etiology and treatment of speech and swallowing disorders resulting from neuropathologies.  Related intellectual, perceptual, social and emotional problems will be considered as well as the neuromuscular symptoms.  Evidence-based practice evidence will be utilized in clinical decision making.

  
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    CSD 635 - Clinical Practice, 3 credit hours


    Students will participate in Clinical Practice experiences off campus at a variety of settings as determined by the Clinic Director.  Students will earn clock hours with a variety of patients with communication disorders across the lifespan.     

  
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    CSD 636 - Clinical Practice, 6 credit hours


    Students will participate in a 15 week Clinical Practice experience off campus at a variety of settings as determined by the Clinic Director.  Students will earn clock hours with a variety of patients with communication disorders across the lifespan.

  
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    CSD 638 - Clinical Practice School Based, 1 credit hour


    Students will participate in an 8-15 week full-time Clinical Practice experience off-campus at a school based setting as determined by the Clinic Director. Students will earn clock hours with a variety of patients with communication disorders.

  
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    CSD 650 - Integrations, 2 credit hours


    This course is designed to help link the content taught in lecture-based classes in the graduate curriculum to the clinic practicum that the student engage in every semester.  Students will participate in service learning projects designed to implement concepts, reflect on clinical experiences, discuss requirements of different clinical settings, and ethical implications of day-to-day clinical practice.  Other topics will be covered as needed.      

  
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    CSD 651 - Integrations, 1 credit hour


    This course is designed to help link the content taught in lecture-based classes in the graduate curriculum to the clinic practicum that the student engage in every semester.  Students will participate in service learning projects designed to implement concepts, reflect on clinical experiences, discuss requirements of different clinical settings, and ethical implications of day-to-day clinical practice.  Other topics will be covered as needed.

  
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    CSD 660 - Research Application, 1 credit hour


    This course is intended to provide the student with the opportunity to engage in a research study within the field of Speech-Language Pathology. The student will work under the direction of a faculty member in the Department.

  
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    CSD 677 - Capstone, 3 credit hours


    A portfolio course in which students integrate the clinical knowledge and skills obtain both in and out of the classroom. Speech and language disorder cases are examined and compared to relevant research evidence. Reflective approaches to learning are incorporated in the learning process.


Computer Science

  
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    CSC 050 - Independent Study, 1-3 credit hours


    This course is designed to assist students in the study of computer topics beyond those included in the regular course offerings. Students working in cooperation with a supervising faculty member may study approved material which does not duplicate a course presently in the curriculum. Independent study credit may only be applied to major requirements if formal approval for such credit is approved prior to the semester in which the work is completed.

  
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    CSC 070 - Internship, Credit hours to be arranged


    Academic credit is offered for appropriate off-campus, computer-related experience.

  
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    CSC 135 - Introduction to Web Site Development, 3 credit hours


    This course is designed to provide experience in the development of basic web sites, focusing on standard web development languages and tools such as HTML, XML, CSS, and JavaScript. Use of web editing tools such as WordPress or Visual Studio is also included. Several web sites will be developed to practice the implementation of the technologies discussed.

  
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    CSC 141 - Advanced Applications for Information Analysis, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Basic computer literacy, including the use of word processing and beginning Excel, is assumed; completion of core MTH course.
    This course focuses on spreadsheet and database technologies with an emphasis on the application of those technologies in the business domain. Topics include creation of spreadsheets and databases, financial and statistical functions, charting, problem solving tools, querying of databases, creation of forms and reports, macros, and the integration of spreadsheets and databases.

  
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    CSC 160 - Introduction to Computing, 3 credit hours


    This course provides an introduction to the computing majors and minors offered at BW including the curricular difference, the professional practices, and the available career opportunities.  In addition, it introduces students to many of the primary areas of computing (including, but not limited to computational thinking, computer networks, operating systems, artificial intelligence) and gives a historical perspective of the discipline.  Problem solving, teamwork and ethics are woven throughout the course.

  
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    CSC 210 - Computer Science I: Programs and Applications, 3 credit hours


    This course covers the fundamental concepts of computers and computer programming. Repetition, selection, procedures, simple data types, arrays, and records are covered. Object-orientation and graphical user interfaces are introduced. Structured design and programming techniques are emphasized.

  
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    CSC 211 - Introduction to Programming in Python, 3 credit hours


    This course is intended to provide students with basic skills and experience in the analysis of problems, the creation of algorithms to solve these problems, and the implementation of the resulting algorithms as working programs. The Python programming language is used and many of the assignments focus on the creation or manipulation of multimedia components. This is the preferred introductory course for students majoring in Digital Media.

  
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    CSC 212 - Intro to Programming for Scientists & Engineers, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of high school Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry are prerequisites for this course. Students are required to have passed the Baldwin Wallace mathematics placement test or to have scored at least 22 on the quantitative portion of the ACT or at least 520 on the quantitative portion of the SAT.
    Introduction to programming for scientists and engineers. Programming concepts such as repetition, selection, functions, strings and other simple datatypes will be introduced in the context of solving problems of interest to scientists and engineers. Emphasis on reproducibility and documentation of computational procedures. Exploration of Data visualization along with scientific computing libraries.

  
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    CSC 235 - System Requirements and Testing, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 160  
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the areas of requirements gathering and testing of computer systems. The course focuses on building the skills necessary to drive a student’s understand, application and success in the Business or Systems Analysis arena. Case studies will be used to explore requirements gathering. Testing topics will include V Model and Testing First models. Students will be introduced to the components of a testing plan and be required to create portions of a test plan using industry standard techniques.

  
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    CSC 240 - Object-Oriented Programming, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 210  
    Prerequisite/Corequisite: MTH 161  

    This three credit course builds on the introductory programming concepts presented in Computer Science I by introducing students to the object-oriented programming paradigm.  Topics include abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, object-oriented design and, as time permits, use of advanced language features such as generics, packages and interfaces.  Students implement several applications of varying complexity in a current object-oriented programming language (currently Java).

  
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    CSC 245 - Data Structures, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 240  and MTH 161  
    This course focuses on the development of advanced data structures that are commonly used in computer science including stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. Emphasis is placed on the efficiency of the various data structures and the applications for which they are used. Advanced language features including inheritance, polymorphism, templates, and exception handling are also studied.

  
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    CSC 250 - Multimedia Programming, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 160  and CSC 210  or CSC 211  
    This course focuses on the creation and integration of computer media including still graphics, animation, video, and sound. A major part of the course will focus on programming techniques and languages for the interactive control of multimedia presentations.

  
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    CSC 253 - Seminar in Computing for the Community I, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 210  or CSC 211  or CSC 212  
    This course and its companion course, Seminar in Computing for the Community II, offers students the opportunity to develop technical skills to fulfill a computing project that can aid a community organization in furthering their objectives. Students learn about the needs-technical and civic-of an organization, gain insight into the cultural context in which the organization operates, and develop a computing project that will then be deployed to the community organization.

  
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    CSC 259 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    CSC 263 - Seminar, 1-3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Dependent upon topic.
    Selected topics in computer science

  
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    CSC 270 - Data Communication Concepts, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 160  
    This course provides an introduction to data communications. Topics include fundamental communications concepts (data and voice); communications hardware, protocols, and software; and network configurations, design, security, control, and management. Topic coverage includes study of LANs, WANs, OSI models, Internet, and intranets.

  
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    CSC 275 - Info Systems Security, Privacy, & Ethics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 160  
    This course explores the social issues, including historical and social context, professional responsibilities, risks and liabilities, and intellectual property of an information system organization. Topics include security policy development life cycle, policy development and implementation process, network security, privacy laws, authentication, and access and information flow controls.

  
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    CSC 280 - Applied Database, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 160  and either CSC 210  or CSC 212 
    This course introduces the fundamental concepts necessary for the use, design, implementation, and management of a database system. The course is project-based, covering database creation, maintenance, and querying using SQL. A relational database management system will be used throughout.

  
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    CSC 285 - Network Diagnostics and Troubleshooting, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 210  & CSC 275  
    This course covers concepts and tools associated with diagnosing and troubleshooting computer networks.  Topics include interpreting documentation, performing online and offline diagnostics, debugging code, interpreting diagnostic results, analyzing log files, and performing troubleshooting techniques.  Course will focus on finding and localizing “problems” rather than correcting them.

  
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    CSC 290 - Computer Networks, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 270 , CSC 285  and either MTH 160  or MTH 161  
    This course covers the design, installation and administration of computer networks at the operating system level from an applied perspective. The course includes a highly integrated hands-on component in which a fully functional single client and peer-to-peer client network is realized within a physical and virtualized platform.

  
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    CSC 291 - Computer Science Research Methods, 2 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 245  and MTH 161  or permission of the instructor
    Performing undergraduate research in computer science requires that students have foundational knowledge and skills related to research methodology. In this course, students will learn the basics of performing research including how to identify a research problem, performing background research, reading published research, and developing a research plan.

  
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    CSC 310 - Software Engineering I, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 235  & CSC 245  
    This is the first of a two-course sequence that presents how engineering principles are applied in the development of large, complex software systems. The focus is on issues of the analysis, design, development, and testing phases of the software development life cycle. Topics presented include software development methodologies, modeling, UML diagrams, and version control, and development for different platforms (PC, web, mobile).

  
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    CSC 311 - Software Engineering II, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 245  & CSC 310  
    Building upon the topics presented in CSC 310 , this course will include topics such as configuration management, design patterns, software validation and verification, deployment, and software evolution.

  
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    CSC 315 - Network Administration, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 290  and either CSC 280  or CSC 380 
    This course covers administering network operating systems. Topics include Windows system and UNIX (Linux) system administration, application (Database, Web) maintenance and interoperability between Windows and Linux systems. A highly integrated hands-on component is used where Windows and Linux systems are realized in a hybrid physical and virtualized environment.

  
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    CSC 320 - Computer Architecture & Organization, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 245  
    This course covers computing history, computer technology and terminology, basic logic design, computer architecture, CPU architecture, memory systems and assembly language.

  
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    CSC 330 - Web & Mobile Programming, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 240  or CSC 245  
    This course focuses on technologies used in the development of Web sites. Topics covered include XML, CSS, JavaScript, ASP.NET/C#, and an introduction to web security.

  
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    CSC 335 - Software Validation and Verification, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 310  
    This course teaches the essential skills necessary to get an understanding of software verification and validation strategies to develop quality software. Students will be introduced to topics in test planning and management, testing tools, reviews, and methods of software testing. Case study examples will be used in this course to give the students an opportunity to use and take informed decisions on the choice of software testing tool /technique used to build quality software system.

  
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    CSC 340 - Data Analysis & Visualization, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): MTH 105 , BUS 208 , and either CSC 280  or CSC 380  
    This course teaches the essential skills necessary to find new ways of understanding and communicating data.  The course will introduce students to basic visualization design and implementation techniques using currently available software tools.  Case study examples will be used throughout the course to give students an opportunity to practice the learned skills.

  
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    CSC 359 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    CSC 360 - Information Systems Project Management, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 280  or CSC 380  
    This course provides a methodical approach to project management in the context of an information system organization. The theory and practice of project management are studied and applied. Topics include system life cycle planning, organizational structures, team building, interview techniques, management functions, project management software, project evaluation and control, and technical writing.

  
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    CSC 364 - Information Systems Analyst Junior Project, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 235 BUS 208 , and either CSC 280  or CSC 380  
    This course and its companion course, Information Systems Analyst Senior Project, allow students to experience various roles related to the development and management of real world systems. Students in this course perform roles that utilize skills such as database management, requirements analysis and quality assurance. Senior students in the course will take on more senior roles such as senior analyst and project manager.

  
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    CSC 380 - Database: Theory, Application, & Administration, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 245 
    This course will introduce students to the design, implementation, and management of small and large databases.  We will examine the mathematical and theoretical basis for different database models with an emphasis on relational databases, but an overview of other models, such as object-oriented databases will be included. The connection between the logical model of the database and the physical mapping of the data, including indexing, will be examined. Related topics covered will include current developments in new database models, data mining, security, and the ethical use of data collection. Practical exercises will include the analysis, design, implementation, and documentation of a data system including a database.

  
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    CSC 391 - Senior Research Proposal, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 291  
    This class will focus on the identification of a problem and the preparation of a research proposal for the required Senior Research Project.  Students will work individually or in teams under the guidance of the faculty member to formally define the hypothesis for their research project and perform related background research. A formal proposal for a research project will be developed and presented by semester’s end.

  
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    CSC 400 - Operating Systems, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 245  
    This course covers operating systems concepts and design, including processes and threads, CPU scheduling, mutual exclusion and synchronization, deadlock, memory management, file systems, networking, distributed systems and systems programming.

  
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    CSC 410 - Advanced Computer Networks, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 290  and MTH 105  
    This course covers advanced concepts and tools associated with network operation and performance. Topics include network topology, network hardware (switches, routers, and firewalls), communication protocols and packet formats, troubleshooting techniques, multi-platform integration, and network security and configuration.

  
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    CSC 415 - Penetration Testing and Defense, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 210  & CSC 315 
    This course covers concepts and tools associated with evaluating the security of a computer system or network and the defense of attacks from malicious outsiders. Topics include the anatomy of an attack, survey of tools used in attacks, strategies used in attacks, and techniques and guidelines on how to prevent or mitigate attacks. Documenting the attacks, from the attacker and the victim perspective, is also covered.

  
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    CSC 430 - Algorithm Design and Analysis, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 245  
    Building on concepts of basic algorithm design and complexity analysis introduced in earlier courses, this course explores advanced algorithm design and analysis. Topics may include advanced data structures, inductive algorithms, graph algorithms, geometric, algebraic, and numeric algorithms, reductions, NP-completeness, and parallel algorithms. Emphasis is placed on formal efficiency analysis of algorithms utilizing concepts from discrete mathematics.

  
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    CSC 440 - Artificial Intelligence, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 245  
    This course will serve as an introduction to artificial intelligence concepts and techniques. Specific topics include a historical and philosophical perspective on AI, the agent paradigm, search techniques, game playing, knowledge representation and reasoning, logic systems, uncertain reasoning and Bayes nets, planning, and machine learning.  Time permitting, special topics in the instructor’s research interests will be covered.

  
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    CSC 453 - Seminar in Computing for the Community II, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 210  or CSC 211  or CSC 212  and two additional CSC courses at the 200-level or higher
    This course and its companion course, Seminar in Computing for the Community (SCFC) I , offers students the opportunity to develop technical skills to fulfill a computing project that can aid a community organization in furthering their objectives. Students learn about the needs-technical and civic-of an organization, gain insight into the cultural context in which the organization operates, and develop a computing project that will then be deployed to the community organization.  Students in SCFC II perform roles such as project manager as they direct teams that students in SCFC I in the context of a real-world project.

  
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    CSC 459 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    CSC 464 - Information Systems Analyst Senior Project, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 340 CSC 360 , CSC 364  & CAS 212  
    This course and its companion course, Information Systems Analyst Junior Project, allow students to experience various roles related to the design, testing, and management of real world systems development. Students in this course perform roles such as senior analyst and project manager as they direct teams that include junior students in the context of a real-world project.

  
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    CSC 470X - Senior Internship, 1 or 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
    This course is designed to be a senior capstone experience in which the student is expected to demonstrate mastery of the skills and concepts acquired throughout the major curriculum. The internship is required to match the individual’s major program and have an emphasis on the application of classroom knowledge to actual practice. All internships must be approved by the faculty of the department. Due to the capstone nature of the course, senior status within the major is a required pre-requisite.

  
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    CSC 471 - Senior Project, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
    Project proposals must demonstrate that the project is of significant breadth and depth to be considered a capstone experience, integrating multiple aspects of the student’s background coursework and extending the student’s knowledge in at least one aspect of their area of concentration.

  
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    CSC 480 - Senior Software Engineering Project I, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 311 
    This two-semester sequence is designed to be a capstone experience in the software engineering major that provides the opportunity to analyze, design, develop, and test a large software system. The projects undertaken will be large-scale and complex, requiring students to apply the engineering principles learned in previous courses. Project will be completed by teams of students. At the end of the experience a final report and presentation will be required.

  
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    CSC 481 - Senior Software Engineering Project II, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CSC 480 
    This two-semester sequence is designed to be a capstone experience in the software engineering major that provides the opportunity to analyze, design, develop, and test a large software system. The projects undertaken will be large-scale and complex, requiring students to apply the engineering principles learned in previous courses. Project will be completed by teams of students. At the end of the experience a final report and presentation will be required.

  
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    CSC 490 - Senior Research Project I, 2 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
    During this course, students work on the research project defined in the pre-requisite Senior Research Proposal course.  Students will conduct their research, making presentations along the way to obtain valuable feedback from the instructor and fellow students.  Progress on the project will be sufficient to enable completion of the research, writing of a thesis and presentation of the work in the subsequent course.

  
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    CSC 491X - Senior Research Project II, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
    This course focuses on completion of the research project defined in the pre-requisite Senior Research Proposal course and developed in the pre-requisite course.  Students will continue to conduct their research, making presentations along the way to obtain valuable feedback from the instructor and fellow students.  Successful completion of the course will require completion of the research, writing of a thesis on the work, and presentation of the completed project.


Criminal Justice

  
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    CRJ 050(I) - Independent Study, Credit hours to be arranged


    Notes: (Elective)

    Students must generally have at least a 3.0 overall G.P.A. See Independent Study Program.

  
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    CRJ 070X - Internship, Credit hours to be arranged


    Notes: (Elective)

    An internship with various criminal justice agencies is available to give students the opportunity to gain practical exposure to the workings of the criminal justice system. Criminal Justice majors are advised to see the director or assistant director of the Criminal Justice program regarding internship opportunities. Students must have junior or senior status to participate. Students should see the director/assistant director at least one semester before the semester that they plan to do the internship. Competitive internships will be announced and may have more stringent requirements. The availability of specific internships may vary.

  
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    CRJ 165 - Overview of the Criminal Justice System, 4 credit hours


    This course examines the criminal justice system, consisting of police, courts and corrections. Acquainting the student with critical issues confronting these subsystems and our society will be of paramount importance. Major topics may include due process, police role, pretrial release, prosecutorial discretion and sentencing.

  
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    CRJ 207 - Introduction to Law, 3 credit hours


    This course represents a basic introduction to the American legal system. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying the various types of law and the types of conflicts they are intended to resolve. Students will be introduced to the analysis of court decisions as a means to understanding some of the processes of legal reasoning. The course examines the law and the legal system from the perspective of the social sciences.

    Crosslisted: POL 207 
  
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    CRJ 223 - Juvenile Delinquency & the Juvenile Justice System, 3 credit hours


    This course examines competing theories of juvenile delinquency; measures which aid in the prevention and control of this behavior are also addressed. Juvenile justice procedures and cases are presented. Attention is also given to the social consequences of juvenile delinquency and to the corresponding legal and social reactions.

    Crosslisted: SOC 223 
  
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    CRJ 255 - Forensic Science and Criminalistics, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 165 
    Forensic Science and Criminalistics is an introductory survey course reviewing the historical development of the field of forensic science, the meaning of evidence and the scientific analysis of evidence in the context of law and criminal investigation. Examples of topics include physical evidence, organic evidence, document evidence, firearm and tool evidence, fingerprints and witness evidence. Students will engage in hands on learning opportunities including demonstrations and labs designed to illustrate and apply course concepts or exemplify skills from the field. Attendance at guest speakers and field trips may be required.

  
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    CRJ 256 - Criminal Investigations, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore or higher status
    This course is an introduction to criminal investigation procedures. It includes a review of the historical development of the investigative process, its relation to law enforcement and the techniques employed in conducting a systematic inquiry and investigation. Investigative concepts and strategies including sources of information, solvability factors, interviewing techniques, the uses of forensic sciences in criminal investigations and Constitutional decisions affecting how investigations are conducted will be considered.

  
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    CRJ 259 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    CRJ 265 - Policing in Society, 3 credit hours


    This course will provide students with a knowledge of the role and functions of the police in our society. Critical issues facing the law enforcement community and our society will be addressed. The primary focus will be on the municipal level, with selective coverage of other levels (county, state, federal) as deemed necessary.

    Crosslisted: SOC 265 
  
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    CRJ 270I - Terrorism: Roots and Responses, 3 credit hours


    Terrorism is often touched on in the news, but how much do you really know about its causes and consequences? Among the topics that are explored are: how terrorism is defined (and sometimes justified), the factors that promote its existence, features of terrorist organizations, the impact of media coverage of terrorist incidents, and the array of counter-terrorism measures undertaken by governments. While the course examines various terrorist campaigns around the world—past and present—the emphasis is on what is sometimes referred to as the “new terrorism.” That is, religiously motivated violence involving radical Islamist factions whose terrorist tactics and extreme violence set it apart from other examples of terrorist campaigns.

    Crosslisted: SOC 270I 
  
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    CRJ 277 - Race, Gender & Justice, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D  or CRJ 165  
    This course explores the intersection between race and gender inequalities and the criminal justice system. It will examine the nature and extent of gender and racial/ethnic minorities as offenders, as victims, and as workers in the criminal justice system. The course will explore theories of criminality, race/ethnicity and gender. The impact of criminal justice related law, policy, and practice on inequalities gender and the larger implications for society and culture will be considered.

  
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    CRJ 309 - Criminal Law and the Constitution, 3 credit hours


    Notes: Recommended background: POL 101D  or American history

    An overview of modern criminal law, both substantive and procedural. Includes such topics as crimes against the person and property. Also includes constitutional law decisions on criminal law in the US: exclusionary rules, right to counsel, fair trial procedures and capital punishment are among the topics discussed. Recommended for Criminal Justice majors and Pre-law students.

  
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    CRJ 313 - Criminology, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D 
    This course focuses on the sociological aspects of crime. The course will include an examination of the nature of criminal law, the variety of theoretical explanations for criminal behavior, the measurement of crime, patterns of crime and the mechanisms for control of criminal behavior.

    Crosslisted: SOC 313 
 

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