2018-2019 University Catalog 
    
    Jul 05, 2022  
2018-2019 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Religion

  
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    REL 259 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    REL 265 - Religion and Literature, 3 credit hours


    A study designed to investigate the religious dimensions of the literary imagination. Emphasis is placed on careful reading of significant literary texts, including fiction, poetry and drama.

  
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    REL 266 - Religion & Film, 3 credit hours


    This course will explore the ways in which film illumines and critiques the religious dimension of life as primarily articulated within the Christian tradition. Themes such as, though not limited to, faith, grace, redemption, evil, and community will be examined.

  
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    REL 290 - Departmental Colloquium, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): One Religion course
    Meets weekly, to discuss various issues in Religion. Required for Majors and Minors. Graded S/U.

  
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    REL 293(I,D) - Topics in Religion, 2-4 credit hours


    Various topics in Religion will be examined. May be repeated, provided that the topic is different.

  
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    REL 359 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    REL 363(I) - Seminar in Religion, 3 or 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ENG-131 and one Religion course or consent of the instructor.
    Advanced examination of various topics in Religion. May be repeated, provided that the topic is different. Required for majors and minors

  
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    REL 459 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    REL 463(I) - Seminar in Religion, 3 or 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ENG-131 and one Religion course or consent of the instructor.
    Advanced examination of various topics in Religion. May be repeated, provided that the topic is different. Required for majors and minors

  
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    REL 491 - Departmental Thesis/project, 3-4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Two upper level seminars

Sociology

  
  
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    SOC 070 - Internship, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    SOC 100D - Principles of Sociology, 4 credit hours


    Would you like to learn important life skills that will help you meet difficult challenges in life? This class introduces you to the controversial issues, competing theories, and scientific methods in sociology. You examine the impact of culture, socialization, and social institutions on human behavior. You also learn to apply the sociological perspective to a study of social class, race, gender, and deviance. Interactive computer exercises aid your understanding of key issues in society. This fun class is comparative in nature, drawing on examples from both the United States and around the world.

  
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    SOC 180I - Archeology and Human Evolution, 3 credit hours


    Voices speak from the dust in this anthropological study of human evolution, from origins through the formation of major early civilizations. Emphasis is on understanding the changing nature of the relationships between human biology, the environment, and adaptation of culture as a way of life.

  
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    SOC 181I - Cultural Anthropology, 3 credit hours


    From the exotic to the more familiar, anthropological study offers unique insights in this introduction to the nature of culture and a comparison of contemporary non-western cultures worldwide. Readings, slides and films help review cultural similarities and differences in subsistence technology, language, social organization, politics and religion. An analysis that views culture as humankind’s most important adaptive tool, a strategy for survival, also suggests cultural anthropology’s relevance for appreciating the modern world’s social, economic and ecological problems.

  
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    SOC 201D - Social Problems, 4 credit hours


    We face many challenges in society today. This course addresses selected social problems and issues in our world today. Emphasis is on conceptions and misconceptions regarding the causes of social problems at the national and international level. Possible solutions and policy implications to these problems are also explored. Working collaboratively with the Community Outreach Office at Baldwin Wallace University, students enrolled in this course may choose to work in various social agencies to address social problems in the greater Cleveland area.

  
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    SOC 206 - Crime in Organizations, 3 credit hours


    Crime isn’t always complex or committed by those in positions of power, but sometimes it is. The primary focus of this course is to acquaint students with the nature and extent of criminal behavior within an organizational context. Accordingly, the course will focus upon analyzing organizational crime and deviance within corporate, governmental and criminal justice settings. Societal attitudes, social and economic consequences and control of these activities are also addressed.

  
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    SOC 210 - Work Matters: The Sociology of Work and Work Settings, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): At least 6 months of full time work experience.
    A rewarding career requires understanding of the role work plays in our lives and the nature of different work settings. Sociologist study the way work roles interrelate on the job and in our families. We will look at issues of diversity, career paths, and the impact of organizational growth and the human toll of downsizing. We will also try to understand the role work plays in the lives of executives, professionals, middle managers, skilled and unskilled workers, and what it means to have no work role because one is unemployed. Students’ will study their own work settings as part of the course and will draw on their own work experience and career goals in class discussion.

  
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    SOC 212 - Families, Couples and Singles, 3 credit hours


    Have you ever wondered about the “health” of today’s family? The meaning of the word itself is changing, as are the circumstances around it in society. This course presents an analysis of family life and the historical development of the family through the examination of comparative family organizations in various societies. A review of recent research in American family structure is undertaken to discover the strengths, weaknesses and the future of various types of domestic lifestyles, including living together couples, single-parent families and other alternative forms. Social policies are also explored in this class.

  
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    SOC 223 - Juvenile Delinquency and the Juvenile Justice System, 3 credit hours


    This course examines competing theories of juvenile delinquency as well as measures which aid in the prevention and control of this behavior. Juvenile justice procedures and cases are presented. Attention is also given to the social consequences of juvenile delinquency and corresponding legal and social reactions.

    Crosslisted: CRJ 223 
  
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    SOC 250(I) - Topics in Sociology, 3 credit hours


    Content will vary. Students may take this course more than once provided that the topic is different each time. Examples: Sociology of Sport, Sociology of Religion, Policies on Aging.

  
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    SOC 259 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    SOC 260 - Death and Dying, 3 credit hours


    The principal purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to study death in modern society. Course objectives include: applying the sociological perspective to understanding death and dying in modern U.S. society; learning how grief is a life-long human dilemma and will study models of grief and bereavement adaptation; developing an interdisciplinary understanding of the complex nature of death in our modern healthcare system and global societies. Students will be challenged to understand the difficult ethical and moral end-of life medical decisions confronting the terminally ill, their families and health care professionals.

  
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    SOC 263(I) - Seminars in Sociology, 1-4 credit hours


    Semesters Offered: Offered occasionally on a variety of topics.

  
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    SOC 265 - Policing of Society, 3 credit hours


    This course will provide students with a knowledge of the role and functions of the police in our society. Critical issues facing the law enforcement community and our society will be addressed. The primary focus will be on the municipal level, with selective coverage of other levels (county, state, federal) as deemed necessary.

    Crosslisted: CRJ 265 
  
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    SOC 270I - Terrorism: Roots and Responses, 3 credit hours


    Terrorism is often touched on in the news, but how much do you really know about its causes and consequences? Among the topics that are explored are: how terrorism is defined (and sometimes justified), the factors that promote its existence, features of terrorist organizations, the impact of media coverage of terrorist incidents, and the array of counter-terrorism measures undertaken by governments. While the course examines various terrorist campaigns around the world—past and present—the emphasis is on what is sometimes referred to as the “new terrorism.” That is, religiously motivated violence involving radical Islamist factions whose terrorist tactics and extreme violence set it apart from other examples of terrorist campaigns.

    Crosslisted: CRJ 270I 
  
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    SOC 280 - Research Methods, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D . Required of all Sociology majors.
    In today’s market, no matter what University graduates pursue as a career goal, they can be expected to provide scientific and objective assessments at different levels. This course is designed to help the student understand the theoretical principles on which scientific research is based and to see how those principles are reflected in the established techniques for doing research. Upon completion of this course, a student can expect to be fairly knowledgeable of concepts in and the structuring of Scientific Inquiry; Modes of Observation, with special emphasis on computer applications in data interpretation; and the social context of research. In addition to the logistical and technical matters, research ethics and relations to public policy are also covered in this course.

  
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    SOC 281 - Data Analysis Using PASW, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 278  or ECN 279  or MTH 105 , and a research course in a discipline related to student’s specialization or consent of the instructor.  Required of all Sociology majors. For Statistics minors, all other required courses in the minor need to be completed before taking this course as a capstone. 
    Valued by employers and graduate schools alike, this course develops marketable skills used in social science analyses as well as in other areas of research like communications, business, and health. Students use the Predictive Analytics Software (formerly Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) to create data files, recode variables, and analyze relationships in the data. Participants in the class learn how to formulate research hypotheses and empirically test them in a user-friendly computer lab. The course is based on conceptual understanding of statistical analysis and emphasizes a practical, working knowledge of various statistical tests with calculations performed by the software. Do analysis of your own choosing, starting with the data and ending with impressive tables and graphs with which to convey the findings to the world. In the end you might like data analysis like many students who took the class before you!

  
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    SOC 288 - Environmental Sociology, 3 credit hours


    What are the cultural and institutional mechanisms that have both contributed to and responded to environmental problems? This course investigates how groups conceptualize and impact natural systems by studying cultural norms and values, and studying how communities and organizations respond to environmental threats. An overview of environmental movements includes an emphasis on environmental justice, both domestically and internationally. Students will propose optimal mechanisms to transform cultural elements and social structures to achieve sustainable societies.

  
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    SOC 290D - Gender Roles, 3 credit hours


    This course examines gender dynamics from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students use scholarly publications to explore the impact of the media, politics, and the workplace on individual experiences. Both macro (social structure) and micro (interpersonal relations) perspectives and social policies are investigated. The focus is primarily on the contemporary United States, but references to other countries, particularly developing countries, will be made where appropriate.

  
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    SOC 301D - Social Inequalities, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D , SOC 201D  or SOC 210 
    Have you ever wondered why some people have more than others, and why these inequalities persist in modern society? This course examines some dominant forms of inequalities, their causes, and some of the social consequences that are adjunct to the process. The course explores the ways in which these impact life in the United States and other nations, and prepares students with some the life skills that will help them cope with these and at the same time make positive changes in their society and the larger global scene. The course covers intermediate level concepts of social inequalities seen from a sociological perspective; forms, causes, and consequences of inequalities; sociological data interpretation; and cross-cultural perspectives on these issues. Social and public policies are also addressed as a necessary corollary to the topics covered in class.

  
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    SOC 302I - Racial and Cultural Minorities, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D  or SOC 201D 
    Increase your understanding of cultural conflict. Many Americans do not realize that most nations in the world have minority populations. We will use macro concepts (social structure) and micro analysis (interpersonal relations) to examine the position of African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and major religious minorities in the U.S. in contrast with conditions of groups in several other countries, including South Africa, Northern Ireland, Brazil, and Canada. Learn a little world geography as a side benefit!

  
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    SOC 303IX - Urban Community Life, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D  or SOC 201D . Required for all Sociology majors
    This course presents an overview of the historical development of the urban community. The dynamics of urbanism are studied, including population changes, different life styles, and urban ecology. An integral component of this course may involve work in the community coordinated through the Community Outreach Office. Students will actively participate in the community applying and integrating knowledge acquired in the classroom with actual programs, social policies, and concerns of the urban community.

  
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    SOC 310 - Work in America, 4 credit hours


    An examination of the meaning of work through the findings of empirical research. Executives, professionals, middle managers, skilled and unskilled workers and the unemployed are studied to learn how the tasks, personal associations and social status connected with work influence values, life style and family relationships. Students’ own work experience and career goals are incorporated into the course.

  
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    SOC 313 - Criminology, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D  or SOC 201D  or HUM 200 . Required of all Sociology majors
    This course focuses on the sociological study of crime. The course includes an examination of the nature of criminal laws, the variety of theoretical explanations for criminal behavior, the measurement of crime, patterns of crime, and the mechanisms for control of criminal behavior.

    Crosslisted: CRJ 313 
  
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    SOC 315 - Sociological Theory, 3 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all Sociology majors.

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D  or SOC 201D , plus 2 additional courses in sociology.
    This course provides an in-depth coverage of major theoretical contributions in sociology. Students will acquire a sense of how social theory has developed historically, understand the strengths and limitations of each theory studied, and develop an ability to evaluate and discuss theories critically. The interdisciplinary nature and relevance of social theory on contemporary society are also investigated.

  
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    SOC 317 - Sociology of Deviance, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D  or SOC 201D 
    This course studies the nature of social deviance, including an overview of differing theoretical perspectives on deviance. Emphasis is on an assessment of causality, typical life styles of various classes of deviants, current societal reaction and possible alternative responses by society to deviancy in its various forms.

  
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    SOC 320 - Victimology, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D  or CRJ 165  
    This course will cover topics such as the patterns of criminal and victim relationship, theories of victimization, victims’ rights and activism, the role of victim in the criminal justice process, and problems of adjustment to victimization and compensating the victim. The various types of victims and victimizations will also be explored.  Students will actively participate in the community service, applying and integrating knowledge acquired in the classroom with actual programs, social policies, and concerns of the urban community.  Sections of Victimology offering experiential learning credit will include tenets of Philanthropic Learning and related content regarding the non-profit sector, grant writing and grant evaluation.

    Crosslisted: CRJ 320  
  
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    SOC 323 - Sociology of Law, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D  (POL 207  highly recommended)
    This course examines major issues and debates in the sociology of law by examining the ways in which law affects social life and the social repercussions of legal decisions. Students will be exposed to a wide range of perspectives and will draw on examples from many legal settings. The goal of this course is to survey the different ways in which sociologists think about and study law and legal institutions, legal actors, and their relationship to social change.

  
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    SOC 330D - Protests, Movements and Social Change, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D  or SOC 201D , plus an additional course in sociology
    Social movements are collective actions by which groups bring about or resist social and political change. Power is a primary conceptual theme – how it is distributed, organized, retained or lost. The women’s movement, gay rights, the environmental movement and fundamentalism are some of the topics studied.

  
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    SOC 344D - Aging and Society, 3 credit hours


    This course examines the social, cultural and group forces involved in aging. Topics include a survey of the larger field of social gerontology (aging studies), the social psychology of the aging individual and social forces involved in the life span in various cultures. Specific issues of health and human services are also covered, such as family relationships, personal growth after retirement, and death and dying.

  
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    SOC 345 - Medical Sociology, 3 credit hours


    This course uses sociological concepts, perspectives and research methods to examine the socio-cultural aspects of health and illness, disease prevention and disease treatment. The course explores the epidemiology and social demography of health, examines the behaviors associated with health and illness, and reviews the experience of illness in various societies. Attention is given to the doctor/patient interaction, the medical professions in changing societies, and the health care delivery systems and social policies regarding medical care in the United States and other nations.

  
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    SOC 350 - Topics In Sociology, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D  or SOC 201D 
    Content will vary. Students may take this course more than once, provided that the topic is different each time. This course designation will include a significantly greater component of academic rigor and/or computer labs/service learning/additional research obligations for students enrolled in this course designation. Examples would be: Social Policies on Aging, Race and Racism from a Socio-Anthropological Perspective, or a sociological study about a particular country.

  
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    SOC 350I - Modern China, 3 credit hours


    Would you like to learn about contemporary China, often seen as America’s future rival in the world? Many Americans including national leaders know very little about China. Information related by the news media is not only frequently inaccurate but also misleading. In this fun and informative class, you get to learn about the Chinese culture, its people, and its achievements. You also explore the complex processes causing the rapid change in China and the pressing social problems its people face every day. You will also become aware of how the solutions to these problems affect issues Americans care about such as American trade imbalance with China, intellectual property protection, energy consumption, environmental pollution, nuclear nonproliferation, and global war against terror. Participation in field trips to local cultural attractions is required. Ideal for students who seek to work in areas of international business, politics, and comparative studies in the humanities and social sciences.

  
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    SOC 359 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    SOC 361 - Corrections, 3 credit hours


    This course acquaints students with an analysis of sentencing, probation, parole and a diverse number of critical issues in penology. Such issues may include the prison environment, deterrence, rehabilitation, retribution, prison violence, capital punishment, prisoners rights, and reform of the system.

    Crosslisted: CRJ 361 
  
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    SOC 365 - Perspectives on Violence, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D  or CRJ 165 
    Americans today seem to be much more concerned about crime, especially violent crime, than in years past. While this fear is understandable, careful consideration of the “violence problem” leads to different ideas than those generally held in the minds of most citizens and those broadcast on national television. This course is an interdisciplinary inquiry into the patterns and correlates of violence, its various forms, such as interpersonal and collective violence, and attempts to control its occurrence.

    Crosslisted: CRJ 365 
  
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    SOC 386I - Global Perspectives, 4 credit hours


    Notes: Recommended Preq: SOC 100D  or Sophomore standing.

    We live in a world where global and local events are increasingly interconnected. The primary purpose of the course is to provide a sociological interpretation of global human dynamics. Issues of concern include areas of changing political economy, ecological sustainability, and international conflict. Major theories of development, i.e., modernization, dependency, and world-system will be examined. Alternative models of development and the role of different cultures in the national quest to advancement will also be discussed. In addition, this course seeks to understand how solutions to common problems such as globalization, environmental degradation, and the war against terror will affect American society as well as the global community.

  
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    SOC 400 - Applied Sociological Research, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 280  and SOC 281 , Senior standing and Sociology Major. Required of all Sociology majors.
    The whole class will undertake an applied research project for an on-campus or off-campus client. The class will design the study, develop the instruments, gather the data, analyze the data, and report the findings to the client.

  
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    SOC 450 - Sociology Proseminar, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Junior status and Sociology Major or Minor. Required of all Sociology majors.
    Integrating knowledge of sociology and its applications are the key element of this course. Students will apply knowledge gained to a special topic throughout the semester. Discussions and assignments will integrate concepts and theories from other courses in the major. Students also prepare a portfolio containing a resume, information about careers, graduate programs, and a network file. Class sessions may include meetings with Career Services and speakers on graduate schools and various career fields.

  
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    SOC 459 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    SOC 463(I) - Seminars in Sociology, 1-4 credit hours


    Offered occasionally on a variety of topics.


Spanish

  
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    SPN 050 - Independent Study, 1-4 credit hours


  
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    SPN 070 - Internship, 1-12 credit hours


  
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    SPN 101 - Elementary Spanish I, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): None. Appropriate course for beginners. Students with more than two years of high school Spanish must have special permission of the instructor to register for SPN 101.
    This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Spanish. Students will learn basic grammar in an oral/aural context in each class. Students of Spanish 101 are expected to develop the four language skills of speaking, listening, basic reading and writing as well as an appreciation of Latino culture. Students will be exposed to native speakers of Spanish in an interactive CD ROM, tele-based program Destinos, and videos on Spain and Spanish-America.

  
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    SPN 102 - Elementary Spanish II, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SPN 101  or equivalent.
    Students of Spanish 102 are expected to enhance the four language skills of speaking listening, reading, and writing. This class will introduce the subjunctive mood, compound tenses, prepositions, and basic conversational skills. Speaking the language is greatly stressed at this level. Students will be exposed to native speakers of Spanish in an interactive CD ROM, telebased program Destinos, and videos on Spain and Spanish-America.

  
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    SPN 110 - Elementary Spanish in Ecuador, 7 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): None
    SPN 110 is offered in Ecuador by Experiment in International Living. It is a beginning language class for students with no more than three years of Spanish. (Appropriate student placement will be determined by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures to which students must present evidence of their high school year/s of Spanish, such as a transcript). This course will cover the equivalent of the first year of language and culture instruction offered in the Spanish Program at Baldwin Wallace University. This is an intensive course that allows students to complete two semesters of Spanish in one semester in Ecuador. Course Structure and Objectives: SPN 110 is an introduction to Spanish language and culture. It will cover basic Spanish grammar and structures and pay particular attention to vocabulary enrichment and knowledge of Latino culture. All skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) and the three basic fields (grammar, introduction to reading, and writing) will be emphasized. See Explorations/Study Abroad program.

  
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    SPN 201 - Intermediate Spanish I, 4 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all Spanish majors.

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 102  or equivalent. SPN 201 is an appropriate entry point for most students with more than two years of high school Spanish.
    One purpose of this class is to review what the student already learned and to expand on her/his first year of Spanish at BW. This is a grammar class with an introduction to cultural and literary readings. All skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking), as well as the three basic fields (grammar, literature, and culture) will be emphasized during the course.

  
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    SPN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II, 4 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all Spanish majors.

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 201  or equivalent.
    An expansion of Spanish language skills developed with exercises in conversation, oral comprehension, composition based on cultural and literary readings.

  
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    SPN 210 - Intermediate/advanced Spanish in Ecuador, 7 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Minimum SPN 101  (See the description of this class below for more details).
    SPN 210 is an intermediate and/or advanced course in Spanish that reviews and expands knowledge of grammar, aural skills (listening and comprehension), and reading and written skills in Spanish. If the student is a Spanish major or minor, this course may be the equivalent of SPN 102 /SPN 201 , SPN 201 /SPN 202 , SPN 202 /SPN 301I , or two of the following courses: SPN 240I , SPN 303I , and/or SPN 311I , however, the exact equivalence will depend on the student’s placement by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. Course Structure and Objectives: SPN 210 is designed to reinforce and expand the Spanish language skills the student has already acquired in the first year of language instruction. During the semester, the student should improve her or his ability to manipulate not only the basic structures of Spanish, but more idiosyncratic and sophisticated structures as well. Special attention will be given to vocabulary enrichment, literary and cultural readings, oral discussions and writing. See Explorations/ Study Abroad program.

  
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    SPN 240I - Contemporary Spain and Latin America, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): None. Given in English. May be taken for major credit if out-of-class research and report is done in Spanish.
    A study and discussion of ongoing and developing events in any field, which present themselves in Spain and Latin America. The course also includes readings and discussions of the Hispanic character and pertinent topics in intercultural communication.

  
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    SPN 250I - Techniques of Spanish Translation, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SPN 202  and SPN 301I  or equivalent.
    A brief introduction to theories of translation followed by practical experience translating various texts.

  
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    SPN 260I - Commercial Spanish, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SPN 202  or equivalent advanced standing with permission of instructor.
    An introduction to commercial and technical terms in Spanish with practice in business correspondence.

  
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    SPN 262(I) - Seminar Taught in English, 1-4 credit hours


    A close study of a selected topic in Spanish. May be repeated if a different topic is offered.

  
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    SPN 263I - Seminar, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SPN 202  or permission of instructor.
    A close study of a selected topic in Spanish. May be repeated if a different topic is offered. Depending on the topic this course may substitute for courses required of the Spanish minor or major.

  
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    SPN 270 - Spanish for Healthcare Providers, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SPN 102  
    Spanish for Health Care Providers is designed to give students a fundamental background in the Spanish that is spoken in health care settings and a greater understanding of Latino culture in the United States. More broadly, this course asks students to consider the legal, ethical, and cultural challenges of delivering healthcare to a culturally and linguistically diverse population. Through conversation practice, simulated oral situations, readings, vocabulary exercises, exams, and short papers in both English and Spanish students will learn to communicate in Spanish in a wide range of situations pertinent to health-related scenarios.

  
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    SPN 301I - Advanced Spanish I, 2 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all Spanish majors. Equivalent to the former SPN-221I course.

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 202  or consent of the instructor.
    This course emphasizes the development of students’ oral proficiency in Spanish through the enrichment of vocabulary, improvement of pronunciation, and review of select grammar topics. Selected cultural and literary readings centering on contemporary Spain and Latin America will form the basis for classroom discussions and presentations. Speaking the language is greatly stressed at this level.

  
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    SPN 302I - Advanced Spanish II, 4 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all Spanish majors. Equivalent to the former SPN-335I course.

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 202  or equivalent.
    This course will focus on further refining and strengthening students’ command of advanced grammar topics studied in Intermediate II (SPN 202 ) while developing the ability to produce formal academic arguments in Spanish. Selected cultural and literary readings centered on contemporary issues in the Spanish-speaking world will form the basis for classroom discussions, writing workshops, essay assignments, and a formal research project.

  
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    SPN 303I - Introduction to Hispanic Literature, 4 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all Spanish majors and minors. Equivalent to the former SPN-275I course.

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 301I  or SPN 302I  
    An introduction to the study of literary texts in Spanish while reading a selection of major authors and literary genres from Spain and Latin America through the centuries. Students will develop the reading, writing, and formal analysis skills that will prepare them for more advanced courses in the major and minor while gaining a basic aesthetic appreciation of Hispanic literature and arts. While reading and analyzing prose, poetry, essay, drama and relevant secondary texts, students will become acquainted the linguistic nuances of the Spanish language as well as become familiar with the historical context and the rich vocabulary presented by the primary texts.

  
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    SPN 310I - Spanish Culture and Civilization, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SPN 202  or equivalent.
    A study of the historical and social development of Spanish culture and civilization.

  
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    SPN 311I - Spanish-American Civilization, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SPN 202  or equivalent.
    A study of the historical, political, economic and cultural development of Latin America.

  
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    SPN 350 - Special Methods Language Teaching, 3-4 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all students seeking a license to teach.

    See EDU 350-357 .

  
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    SPN 375I - Survey of Spanish Literature, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SPN 303I  or equivalent.
    A study of the major literary movements, representative authors and selections from their works from the 12th century to the 20th century. Short stories, poetry, essays and the theater are included.

  
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    SPN 376I - Survey of Spanish-American Literature, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SPN 303I  or equivalent.
    A study and interpretation of a select number of major literary works from Latin America.

  
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    SPN 463 - Seminar, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing and permission of instructor.
    SPN 463 is intended to be a capstone seminar which builds on a significant understanding of Hispanic Studies. Topics may vary. Students may take the course twice if different topics are offered.


Sustainability

  
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    SUS 070X - Sustainability Internship, 1-12 credit hours


  
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    SUS 150I - Humans & The Earth: Can We Coexist?, 3 credit hours


    This team taught course examines global environmental issues, such as climate, energy, development, biodiversity, and population from interdisciplinary perspectives. These perspectives will vary depending upon the academic disciplines of the three faculty members who instruct the course. Students in the old core will satisfy three core credits, either in the sciences (BIO 150I ), the social sciences (ECN 150I /POL 150I ), or the humanities (HUM 150I ) and an International course requirement. Offered as SUS 150I, BIO 150I , HUM 150I , ECN 150I , and POL 150I  in the new core, the course satisfies the Interdisciplinary requirement and is counted towards the International requirement. Humans and the Earth is also a required course for the Sustainability Program major and minor. It may be counted towards the requirements of the Sustainability Program Certificate .

  
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    SUS 363 - Integrated Sustainability Topics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): At least nine (9) credit hours of completed courses listed in the Sustainability major with three different prefixes; and Humans and the Earth (POL/BIO /HUM /ECN 150I ) or at least 45 completed credit hours.
    Contemporary sustainability issues are inherently complex and demand the integration of knowledge and skills from different disciplines to fully address them. Courses will take an integrative, in-depth approach to investigate one topic or theme in sustainability. In order to facilitate an interdisciplinary learning experience, the courses will be taught by two faculty members from different disciplines. Specific topics will vary.

  
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    SUS 400 - Sustainability Capstone, 3 credit hours


    This team-taught course explores a prominent sustainability theme to be determined by the instructors. Examination of the theme will be broadly and intentionally interdisciplinary, drawing as widely as possible upon knowledge, skills, and learnings obtained in those courses in the major. It will have an inherent problem-solving focus based upon a “real world” sustainability issue. The course will include a significant team-based project that engages students in an issue currently faced by significant social actors. Thus, it aims not only to integrate disciplinary knowledge and skills but also to apply those disciplines to real-life sustainability practice. One of its aims is to provide graduates with a significant team based, problem-solving experience that demonstrates important competencies in the emergent field of sustainability.


Theatre

  
  
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    THE 070 - Internship, Credit hours to be arranged


    Practical experience in any area of theatre.

  
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    THE 100 - Introduction To Theatre, 3 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all theatre majors and minors

    An introduction to the major ideas, influences and practices which shape theatre today. The emphasis of the course is to develop the student’s critical ability to evaluate and appreciate theatre performance.

  
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    THE 135 - Singing for Actors, 2 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all theatre majors in the acting track.

    An introduction to the basic elements of singing, including physiological aspects of the singing process and expressive singing with an emphasis on development of individual performance skills. The purpose of the course is to aid students in becoming more marketable as professional actors.

  
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    THE 150 - Makeup for the Stage, 1 credit hour


    Notes: Required of all theatre majors in the acting and directing track.

    A basic course in the fundamental principles and practices of designing and applying stage makeup. Emphasis will be placed on the development of application techniques and familiarization with materials. Additional lab hours required.

  
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    THE 151 - Introduction to Acting, 2 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all theatre minors

    A basic course designed to introduce non-majors to the principles of acting. Emphasis is placed on body control, interpretation, improvisation and scene work.

  
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    THE 154 - Creative Dramatics, 2 credit hours


    A course designed to familiarize the elementary/secondary school teacher with the use of creative dramatics in the classroom. Theory as well as practical application of the arts and crafts of theatre will be considered.

  
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    THE 160 - Acting I, 3 credit hours


    This course focus on developing and refining the vocal and physical skills necessary to effectively perform a full range of dramatic texts, including verse. This is accomplished through practical voice work and its application to texts, including Shakespeare.

  
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    THE 161 - On-stage Experience, 1 credit hour


    After being cast in a play, a student may register for credit for on-stage experience. Registration with instructor’s permission only.

    Graded: S/U
  
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    THE 162 - Backstage Experience, 1-2 credit hours


    Notes: Two hours required of theatre majors and minors and dance minors.

    A student may register for backstage work on plays being offered during the semester. Hours toward credit can include working in the scene or costume shop or crewing a show. Registration with instructor’s permission only.

  
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    THE 169 - Acting on Camera, 3 credit hours


    This course attempts to synthesize concept and technique through the directed practice of improvisational performance.  This course is primarily active and participatory in nature.  Relying on the communal / ensemble exercises provided in Spolin’s “Improvisation for the Theatre”, the student will explore the “seven aspects of spontaneity” and will learn to create narrative improvisations.  Students will also explore concepts of character, behavior in environment, creating the who? what? and where? of dramatic scenes, creating from given circumstances, and will involve themselves with the special problems of improvisation in performance.

  
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    THE 175 - Stagecraft for the Actor, 2 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all Musical Theatre Majors

    An introduction of the basic stagecraft skills required of the actor working in a professional environment. Emphasis is placed on developing a knowledge and appreciation for all areas of stage design (scenic, costumes, sound, and lighting). Both lecture and laboratory experience is included. Students will be required to complete a practical component to the course by working on one of the stage crews.

  
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    THE 180 - Stagecraft, 3 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all theatre majors and minors

    A study of the principles and practices of stage scenery construction. Emphasis is placed on utilization of materials and appropriate technology. Both lecture and laboratory experience is included.

  
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    THE 190 - Script Analysis, 3 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all theatre majors and minors.

    Theory, analysis, and interpretation of scripts for the purpose of play production; an introduction to American and international playwrights, spanning 2,000 years.

  
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    THE 220 - Rendering Techniques, 3 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all theatre majors in the design and technical studies track.

    An introduction to rendering techniques required to communicate in technical theatre and design. Students will be encouraged to explore a variety of mediums and discover a personal style best suited to their artistic aesthetics.

  
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    THE 240 - Vectorworks, 3 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all theatre majors in the scenic/lighting design and technical studies track.

    This course covers the basics of learning how to draw in Vectorworks, a software program used in theatrical drafting, technical drawing and 3D modeling.

  
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    THE 250 - Audition Techniques, 2 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all theatre majors in the acting and directing track. Take sophomore year.

    Career development course focusing on audition fundamentals, marketing, resumes, headshots, on-camera training and monologue preparation.

  
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    THE 251 - Portfolio Presentation, 2 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all theatre majors in the design and technical studies track. Recommended junior year.

    Prerequisite(s): THE 220 
    Students will learn the fundamentals of creating a theatre design and technical portfolio. Emphasis will be placed on the presentation and critical evaluation of the artistic aesthetics. Students will also be required to create a professional website devoted to their creative and professional work.

  
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    THE 259 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    THE 260 - Acting II, 3 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all theatre majors in the acting and directing track.

    Prerequisite(s): THE 160  or MUC 146  
    An intermediate acting course focusing on the teachings of Constantin Stanislavski. Performance skills are developed through character analysis, improvisation, monologues and scenes.

  
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    THE 261 - The Actor’s Voice, 3 credit hours


    Study and practice of fundamentals of vocal production: breathing, quality, articulation, projection, and expressiveness for the performing artist.

 

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