2018-2019 University Catalog 
    
    Oct 20, 2020  
2018-2019 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Criminal Justice

  
  •  

    CRJ 320 - Victimology, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D  or CRJ 165  
    This course will cover topics such as the patterns of criminal and victim relationship, theories of victimization, victims’ rights and activism, the role of victim in the criminal justice process, and problems of adjustment to victimization and compensating the victim. The various types of victims and victimizations will also be explored.  Students will actively participate in the community service, applying and integrating knowledge acquired in the classroom with actual programs, social policies, and concerns of the urban community.  Sections of Victimology offering experiential learning credit will include tenets of Philanthropic Learning and related content regarding the non-profit sector, grant writing and grant evaluation.

    Crosslisted: SOC 320  
  
  •  

    CRJ 359 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
  •  

    CRJ 361 - Corrections, 3 credit hours


    The focus of this course will be upon acquainting the student with an analysis of sentencing, probation, parole and a diverse number of “critical issues” in penology. Such issues may include the prison environment, deterrence, rehabilitation, retribution, prison violence, capital punishment, prisoners’ rights and reform of the system.

    Crosslisted: SOC 361 
  
  •  

    CRJ 365 - Perspectives on Violence, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100D  or CRJ 165 
    Americans today seem to be much more concerned about crime, especially violent crime, than in years past. While this fear is understandable, careful consideration of the “violence problem” leads to different ideas than those generally held in the minds of most citizens and those broadcast on national television. This course is an interdisciplinary inquiry into the patterns and correlates of violence, its various forms, such as interpersonal and collective violence, and attempts to control its occurrence.

    Crosslisted: SOC 365 
  
  •  

    CRJ 459 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
  •  

    CRJ 464 - Integrative Seminar in Criminal Justice, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Participation in Criminal Justice Program, Senior status (Junior or Senior status for Evening/Weekend CRJ majors).
    This is a 400-level course limited to Criminal Justice majors or minors. A primary focus is to substantively analyze some of the key issues affecting the subsystems of law enforcement, courts, and corrections, particularly from an ethical, and where feasible, an interdisciplinary perspective. Students will also have an opportunity to explore career options within the criminal justice system.


Dance

  
  •  

    DAN 050 - Independent Study, Credit hours to be arranged


  
  •  

    DAN 070 - Internship, Credit hours to be arranged


    Practical experience in any area of dance.

  
  •  

    DAN 201 - Injury Prevention and Health in the Performing Arts, 3 credit hours


    This course will provide the student with an opportunity to explore the health and safety issues peculiar to the performing arts (music, voice, theatre and dance), as well as define and develop health-promoting and wellness behaviors. The course will cover common performance related injuries and health issues and students will learn basic preventive strategies. Students will develop the skills necessary to appropriately examine health and safety-related issues pertinent to the performing artist as a healthy human being.

  
  •  

    DAN 214I - Dance History, 3 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all dance minors.

    A survey course of the history of dance. The course is designed to present to the student a broad overview of dance in various world cultures through the ages. Applicable to the fine arts requirement of the University core and the international studies requirement of the University core.

    Semesters Offered: May be offered less frequently than once a year.

  
  •  

    DAN 217D - Dance in America, 3 credit hours


    Course is designed to introduce the student to the vast discipline of dance. Students will view and read about dance as an art form and as a theatrical vehicle and become more aware of the analysis of form and style and elements of critique in the various genres of dance. The course will trace the American dance scene and its impact on and reflection of American culture. No previous knowledge and/or training in dance is required. Course applicable to fine arts requirement of University core. Some additional cost may be involved for purchase of performance tickets.

  
  •  

    DAN 220 - Ballet II Practicum, 1 credit hour


    Notes: Required of all dance minors.

    Prerequisite(s): HPE 120W 
    This is a beginning/intermediate level course designed for students to continue developing their technical skills and adding to their ballet vocabulary. Special emphasis will be placed on correct body alignment, spatial awareness, range of motion, and establishing habits that will promote a healthy and safe approach to performing movement.

    *This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.
  
  •  

    DAN 221 - Jazz II Practicum, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): HPE 121W 
    This beginning/intermediate level course focuses on increasing the movement vocabulary of jazz dance technique. Students will start to explore different forms of jazz and styles.

    *This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.
  
  •  

    DAN 222 - Modern II Practicum, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): HPE 122W 
    This beginning/intermediate level course focuses on increasing the movement vocabulary of modern dance technique. Students will learn, comprehend and execute movement drawn from relevant techniques including Graham, Limon, postmodern and release. Special emphasis will be placed on floor work, alignment and spatial awareness in the performance of movement sequences, and establishing habits that will promote a healthy and safe approach to performing movement.

    *This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.
  
  •  

    DAN 223 - Tap II Practicum, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): HPE 123W 
    This beginning/intermediate level course focuses on increasing the movement vocabulary of tap. Students will start to explore different rhythms and tempos.

    This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.
  
  •  

    DAN 263 - Seminar, 2-4 credit hours


    The study of topics relevant to dance. Sample topics include Flamenco Dance, Hip Hop and Partnering. May be repeated more than once, provided the subject or topic is different.

  
  •  

    DAN 320 - Ballet III Practicum, 1 credit hour


    Notes: Required of all dance minors.

    Prerequisite(s): DAN 220 
    This intermediate level course focuses on continued development of classical ballet technique. Students will learn, comprehend and execute movement drawn from the ballet cannon. Special emphasis will be placed on phrasing and technical competence in the performance of extended combinations.

    *This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.
  
  •  

    DAN 321 - Jazz III Practicum, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): DAN 221 
    This intermediate level course focuses on continued development of jazz dance technique. Students will continue explore different forms and styles of jazz. Special emphasis will be placed on the competence in the performance of extended movement combinations.

    *This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.
  
  •  

    DAN 322 - Modern III Practicum, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): DAN 222  
    This intermediate level course focuses on continued development of modern dance technique. Students will learn, comprehend and execute movement drawn from relevant techniques including Graham, Limon, post-modern and release. Special emphasis will be placed on phrasing and technical competence in the performance of extended movement sequences, improvisational exercises and works from the modern dance repertoire.

    *This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.
  
  •  

    DAN 323 - Tap III Practicum, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): DAN 223 
    This intermediate level course focuses on continued development of tap dancing technique. Special emphasis will be placed on the competence in the performance of extended movement combinations and shading.

    *This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.
  
  •  

    DAN 324 - Hip Hop I, 1 credit hour


    This introductory course will include warm-up, progressions and choreography.  The warm-up will focus on strengthening, stamina, flexibility, finding control in isolated movements, and creating specific lines.  Progressions will emphasize weight and directional changes, rhythmic precision, and hip hop grooves. Students will use the information from warm-up and progressions to build choreographed routines. We will explore related hip hop techniques such as locking, popping, breaking and freestyle.

    *This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.

  
  •  

    DAN 325 - Pointe I, 1 credit hour


    This beginning level class is designed for students who have gained enough strength and technique to begin their pointe training. The course will cover the correct fit, preparation and care of shoes, and focus on developing the foot and ankle strength required for performing basic pointe work at the barre and eventually, in the center, with emphasis on correct body alignment. Students must get permission from the instructor to enroll, and be registered in another dance technique class during the same semester.

    *This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.

  
  •  

    DAN 331 - Improvisation & Choreography, 3 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all dance minors.

    Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
    This course provides opportunities for experience in the use of improvisational techniques as a basis for the development of skill necessary for the art of choreography. Applicable to the fine arts requirement of the University core. May be offered less frequently than once a year. This course was formerly taught as a two credit hour course. Students who have completed the two credit offering of the course may not enroll in nor receive credit for the three credit course.

  
  •  

    DAN 332 - Introduction to Teaching Dance/Movement, 2 credit hours


    Notes: Required of all dance minors

    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of teaching dance in a studio setting, and prepares them to clearly interpret a choreographer’s intentions so they can successfully lead a movement rehearsal in preparation for performance.

  
  •  

    DAN 420 - Ballet IV Practicum, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): DAN 320 
    This intermediate/advanced level course is designed for students with a thorough foundation in dance, that have completed Ballet I – III, and those who intend to have a career in the performing arts. Emphasis will be placed on refining classical ballet technique in traditionally structured classes consisting of barre work and extended center combinations. Students will also be challenged to improve their performance and partnering skills and learn and perform classical variations.

    *This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.
  
  •  

    DAN 421 - Jazz IV Practicum, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): DAN 321 
    This intermediate/advanced level course focuses on the continued development of jazz dance technique in varied styles, improvisation and is designed for students with a thorough foundation in jazz and who have completed Levels 1-3. Special emphasis will be placed on refining technique, phrasing and technical competence in the performance of extended movement combinations.

    *This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.
  
  •  

    DAN 423 - Tap IV Practicum, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): DAN 323 
    This intermediate/advanced level course focuses on the continued development of tap dancing, improvisation and is designed for students with a thorough foundation in tap and who have completed Levels 1-3. Special emphasis will be placed on refining technique, phrasing and technical competence in the performance of extended movement combinations.

    *This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.
  
  •  

    DAN 424 - Hip Hop II, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): DAN 324  
    This course will focus on continued development of Hip Hop dance.  Warm-up, progressions and choreography will be part of each class.  A stronger emphasis will be placed on learning choreography quickly.  Movements will be more intricate with challenges in musicality.  We will continue to explore various styles of hip hop movement.

    *This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.

  
  •  

    DAN 425 - Pointe II, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): DAN 325  
    This beginning/intermediate level class is designed for students who have successfully completed Beginning Pointe Technique.  Building on that foundation, students will be introduced to more complex combinations and basic ballet variations. Students must get permission from the instructor to enroll, and be registered in another dance technique class during the same semester.

    *This course also has a required studio component in addition to regular class times.


Diversity Studies

  
  •  

    DST 070 - Internship, 1-12 credit hours


  
  •  

    DST 463 - Seminar in Diversity Studies, 3 credit hours


    This is an integrative seminar intended to help students achieve an ability to deal with complex problems relating to the diversity of American society. The course is intended to help students integrate the knowledge they have acquired from their elective courses; conceptual issues will be of great importance. The seminar will culminate in a research paper or other appropriate project. The seminar, which may be team taught, will deal with selected topics chosen by the professors offering the course.


Economics

  
  •  

    ECN 050 - Independent Study, 1-4 credit hours


    Intended to encourage the development of study in the broadest sense, utilizing every avenue to the development of a creative and critical exchange of ideas. The number of credit hours involved will depend on the nature of the independent study program undertaken by the student. Independent study courses are not designed to serve as substitutes for any course offered in the department. They are intended to give students an opportunity to expand their knowledge and give critical analysis to specific areas of economics. See Guidelines for Independent Study available in the Economics Department office for further information.

  
  •  

    ECN 070 - Internship, 1-8 credit hours


    Economics majors and other students interested in economics are encouraged to participate in the Internship Program. The purpose of the Program is to enable students to broaden their horizons by merging valid work experience with classroom training. All Internship programs in economics must be coordinated through the Office of Career Services and the Department of Economics. See Guidelines for Internships available in the Economics Department office for further information.

  
  •  

    ECN 100 - Survey of Economics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Math readiness only.
    Designed partially to fulfill the general curriculum requirement in social science. (Also see requirements for BUS minors and for EDU Middle Childhood.) A study of economic relationships, problems and institutions. ECN 100 may not be taken for credit if a student has earned previous credit for ECN 201  and/or ECN 202 .

  
  •  

    ECN 103 - Problem Solving in Microeconomics, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): MTH 121  or higher
    Corequisite(s): ECN 201  
    A course for students of Principles of Microeconomics, emphasizing the use of algebraic tools to the economic analysis of problems involving competitive markets, profit maximization, benefit/cost, strategic behavior, and the like.

  
  •  

    ECN 104 - Problem Solving in Macroeconomics, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): MTH 121  or higher
    Corequisite(s): ECN 202  
    A course for students of Principles of Macroeconomics, emphasizing the use of algebraic tools to the economic analysis of problems involving macroeconomic equilibrium, economic growth, monetary and fiscal policies, and the like. 

  
  •  

    ECN 110 - Economics of Social Issues, 1-3 credit hours


    An introductory course designed to explore contemporary social issues using an economist’s perspective. Emphasis placed on understanding context, economic principles, evidence, and alternative policy solutions. Three specific topics varying semester-to-semester. May include economics of crypto-currency and blockchain, universal basic income (UBI), superstars, public arts, health care, or fraud. Not a survey of economics course.

  
  •  

    ECN 150I - Humans & The Earth: Can We Coexist?, 3 credit hours


    This team taught course examines global environmental issues, such as climate, energy, development, biodiversity, and population from interdisciplinary perspectives. These perspectives will vary depending upon the academic disciplines of the three faculty members who instruct the course. Students in the old core will satisfy three core credits, either in the sciences (BIO 150I ), the social sciences (ECN 150I/POL 150I ), or the humanities (HUM 150I ) and an International course requirement. Offered as SUS 150I , BIO 150I , HUM 150I , ECN 150I, and POL 150I  in the new core, the course satisfies the Interdisciplinary requirement and is counted towards the International requirement. Humans and the Earth is also a required course for the Sustainability Program major and minor. It may be counted towards the requirements of the Sustainability Program Certificate .

  
  •  

    ECN 163 - Topics in Economics, 1-3 credit hours


    Examination of special topics in economics.

  
  •  

    ECN 201 - Principles of Economics I (Micro), 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): MTH 121  or higher, or completion of 30 credit hours.
    Principles and problems of microeconomics: price, value and distribution. Economic decision making under different market structures is analyzed. Emphasis is placed on the efficient allocation of resources by firms and owners of the factors of production.

  
  •  

    ECN 202 - Principles of Economics II (Macro), 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 201  
    Principles and problems of macroeconomics: national income, employment, inflation, economic growth, monetary and fiscal policies, international economics and alternative economic systems.

  
  •  

    ECN 259 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
  •  

    ECN 279 - Basic Statistical Methods, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): MTH 120  or higher
    Introduction to basic statistical concepts and techniques including descriptive statistics, probability, and inferential statistics including sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression. Emphasis is placed on data analysis and quantitative literacy with applications in economics, business and the social sciences.

  
  •  

    ECN 288X - Engineering Economics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): MTH 142  
    A course for advanced students of Economics or Engineering. Topics and applications explored in the first half of this course will include: time value of money as applied to problems of investment, optimal search, product life, and optimal harvesting; benefit-cost problems as applied to infrastructure, bio-diversity, and community amenity projects; problems in project selection as applied to risk management involving R&D projects. In the second half of the course, teams of students will address and solve a complex problem for a client in the local community.

  
  •  

    ECN 301 - Intermediate Economics I (Micro Theory), 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 201 
    An in-depth intermediate level discussion of price and value theory, as well as distribution theory. The economic decision-making process of consumers, business firms and owners of factors of production operating under different market structures is given rigorous analysis.

  
  •  

    ECN 302 - Intermediate Economics II (Macro Theory), 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 202 
    An in-depth intermediate level discussion of macroeconomics, including an analysis of income determination through the classical and Keynesian models. The analysis includes an examination of the theories of consumption and investment, the nature and causes of business cycles, and the determinants of economic growth.

  
  •  

    ECN 320 - Research Methods and Design, 2 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 201 , ECN 202  & ECN 279  
    Corequisite(s): ECN 321  
    A lecture-laboratory combination prepares students to conduct research in economics. Topics covered include research design and data collection, overview of the research process in economics, preparation of survey article, draft of a research proposal, and proficiency using a software application(s) for graphing, simulating, and computing.

  
  •  

    ECN 321 - Data Analysis Lab, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 201 , ECN 202  & ECN 279  
    Corequisite(s): ECN 320  
    A lecture-laboratory combination prepares students to conduct research in economics. Topics covered include research design and data collection, overview of the research process in economics, preparation of survey article, draft of a research proposal, and proficiency using a software application(s) for graphing, simulating, and computing.

  
  •  

    ECN 339 - Money & Banking, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 100  or ECN 202 
    A study of the history, organization and operation of monetary and banking institutions, including the money markets, their role in the functioning of the economy and monetary and fiscal policies.

  
  •  

    ECN 340I - History of Economic Thought, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 100  or ECN 201 , ECN 202 
    This course examines the evolution of ideas from the earliest of progenitors to modern times. It particularly emphasizes the development of economic theory and methods of the Classicals, Marxists, Neoclassicals and Keynesians.

  
  •  

    ECN 341 - US Economic History, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 100  or ECN 201 , ECN 202 
    This course is a survey of the economic development of the United States. It emphasizes the development of commerce and industry, the structural changes in the economy, and the policy adaptations to these changes.

  
  •  

    ECN 344 - Game Theory, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 100  or ECN 201  or POL 101D  
    This course addresses the nature of competition and cooperation in economics and business, as well as how cooperative behavior evolves. The notion of Prisoner’s Dilemmas and the means by which players and societies extract themselves from the dilemma of individual vs. social rationality will be our focus. We will ask whether purely self-interested behavior is always in the “best” interests of the individuals involved or whether there are long-term benefits of cooperation.

  
  •  

    ECN 349D - Labor Economics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 100  or ECN 201  
    Application of microeconomic theory to the analysis of the 21st century American labor market. Labor supply and demand, human capital investment, compensating wage differential, labor mobility, occupational segregation, labor market discrimination, and government policies are examined in the context of current trends and institutional features highlighting the differing employment experiences of men-women, racial and ethnic groups, and other marginalized groups in modern America.

  
  •  

    ECN 352 - Public Finance, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 201  
    A study of the economic basis for governmental activity. Emphasis is placed on efficiency, market failure, externalities, public goods and collective choice. The theory of taxation and tax incidence is discussed and applied to contemporary tax policy issues. Alternative means of financing government activity and the distribution of powers among governments in a federal system are analyzed.

  
  •  

    ECN 354 - Law and Economics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 100  or ECN 201 
    This upper-level course presents an economic view of the justice system. Topics include principles of welfare economics as applied to property, contract, and tort law. It also examines the economics of deterrence of both financial and capital crime.

  
  •  

    ECN 356D - Urban & Regional Economics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 100  or ECN 201 
    A study of growth and development of cities and regions. Economic theories of urban and regional development are studied.  Topics include determinants of business location decisions, regional economic growth or decline, population shifts, employment opportunities, and inter/intra-regional competition and trade.

  
  •  

    ECN 358 - Environmental Economics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 100  or ECN 201  
    A study of the economic approaches to environmental and natural resource issues. The study includes the ideas, concepts, and theories that have influenced economists in the formulation of environmental and natural resource policy. The greater emphasis will be on environmental economics.

  
  •  

    ECN 359 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
  •  

    ECN 360I - The Global Economy and Comparative Systems, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 100  or ECN 202  
    A comparative study of the organizational arrangements, policies, and outcomes of difference economic systems in theory and as practiced in various nations of the world.

  
  •  

    ECN 362I - Economics of Developing Countries, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 201  or ECN 202  
    A study of issues and problems of the economic development of emerging countries: concepts of development and growth, theories of development, domestic and international significance of development plans.

  
  •  

    ECN 363 - Topics in Economics, 1-3 credit hours


    Examination of special topics in economics.

  
  •  

    ECN 365I - International Economics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 100  or ECN 202 
    A study of the economic relations among the nations, the causes and effects of international specialization and exchange, structural changes in the international economy, and international economic policies. The course emphasizes (1) the theory of international trade and (2) the theory of international finance, including a unit on economic integration (common markets).

  
  •  

    ECN 379 - Advanced Statistical Methods, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 279  
    A continuation of ECN 279  into advanced statistical techniques and use of software for data analysis. Topics include multiple linear regression, hypothesis testing, and addressing deviations from the assumptions of the classical linear model including omitted variables, multi-collinearity, heteroscedasticity, serial correlation. Learners will choose a research question, preform an analysis, and produce a written report.

  
  •  

    ECN 425 - Mathematical Topics in Economics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): MTH 142 , MTH 211  and ECN 301  or ECN 302 
    Topics include advanced micro and macro theory. Required for the Mathematical Economics major.

  
  •  

    ECN 459 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
  •  

    ECN 464 - Research Seminar, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all required courses for Economics majors and senior standing or permission of instructor; for non-majors senior standing or permission of instructor.
    In this senior capstone experience students will review and discuss the main research methods used by economists. Students will undertake a capstone research project following the scientific method. Students will select and refine a research question. A thorough research of the literature will be conducted. Hypothesis construction, data analysis, and conclusions will be premised on economic theory. Results will be presented and discussed at various stages of the research process. As a Writing Extension course students will engage in instructor guided, authentic writing opportunities.

  
  •  

    ECN 491 - Departmental Thesis/project, Credit hours to be arranged


    Open only to students receiving permission of the Dean of the University and having at least a 3.00 cumulative point average. Departmental Thesis/Projects are intended to afford the student an opportunity to engage in a study of a fairly comprehensive field of knowledge, to carry on original investigation where this is possible, and to develop the ability to express oneself. The student works under the direction of a faculty member for Departmental Thesis/Project work. The Guidelines for Departmental Thesis/Project are available in the Economics Department office.

  
  •  

    ECN 492 - Departmental Thesis/project, Credit hours to be arranged


    Open only to students receiving permission of the Dean of the University and having at least a 3.00 cumulative point average. Departmental Thesis/Projects are intended to afford the student an opportunity to engage in a study of a fairly comprehensive field of knowledge, to carry on original investigation where this is possible, and to develop the ability to express oneself. The student works under the direction of a faculty member for Departmental Thesis/Project work. The Guidelines for Departmental Thesis/Project are available in the Economics Department office.


Education

  
  •  

    EDU 101X - Introduction to Education and Teaching, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): This course includes a field experience. To complete the experiential requirement, BOTH EDU 101X AND EDU 103DX  must be completed at BW.
    This course will introduce the beginning student in professional education to teaching at the various levels and licensure areas. Students will explore the foundation of American education; emerging models of teaching; structural reforms; diversity of learners; multicultural education; state and national standards; and issues and trends affecting education. In addition to the scheduled class time, a 15 clock-hour field observation will be required as part of the course requirements.

  
  •  

    EDU 103DX - Education of Children with Special Needs, 2 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): This course includes a field experience. To complete the experiential requirement, BOTH EDU 101X  AND EDU 103DX must be completed at BW.
    Prerequisite/Corequisite: EDU 101X  may be taken concurrently. For music therapy or music education students either MUC 151  or MUC 171  are co or prereqs.

    This is a survey course designed to introduce the students to characteristics of learners with special learning, physical and emotional needs. Public laws, court cases, teaching and accommodation strategies will be explored as they relate to trends in reaching students with disabilities, gifts and talents, and diverse cultural needs in both special education and inclusive K-12 settings.

    A field experience is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 114 - 21st Century Productivity Tools, 1 credit hour


    This course provides students with a foundation for the effective use of technology for their own learning experience and for their preparation as effective 21st Century professionals. Topics include digital citizenship, copyrights, podium management, and technology platforms. Also included is a review of common software and hardware employed for presentations, productivity, and to encourage individuals’ responses and interactions to enhance learning. The successful student will complete the course with the skills needed for managing multiple types of professional documents in various contexts across several digital platforms.

  
  •  

    EDU 201 - Teaching Strategies and Management Skills, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 100  and completion of 100 level EDU courses
    Corequisite(s): Must be taken concurrently with EDU 214  
    Students will study general strategies for teaching students ages 3 through 21. Areas to be included are: planning for instruction; questioning, probing, and reinforcement skills; classroom management theories and techniques; observational, clinical and peer teaching skills.

  
  •  

    EDU 203 - Theoretical Foundations in Early Childhood Education, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 100 level EDU courses
    Corequisite(s): May be taken concurrently with EDU 204  
    This course is designed to provide students with an overview of programs in early childhood education (ages 3-8). Attention will be given to the early childhood profession, its historical, philosophical, and social foundations and how they influence current thought and practice. The purpose of the course is to develop candidates’ understanding of the theoretical underpinnings that influence instruction in early childhood education. The course will provide the theoretical basis which guides teaching and learning.

    This course includes a 25 hour field experience in a preschool setting.
  
  •  

    EDU 204 - Phonics and Spelling Development, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 100 level EDU courses
    Corequisite(s): May be taken concurrently with EDU 203  
    This course focuses on phonics content and developmental spelling. Students will learn strategies for teaching phonics and spelling in the literacy curriculum.

  
  •  

    EDU 205 - Introduction to Middle Childhood Education, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 100 ; Completion of 100 level EDU courses; EDU 201  or EDU 207 .
    The students will study the philosophy, curriculum organization, and goals of middle childhood education. The nature of emerging adolescent learners and teaching methodologies unique to this population will be emphasized.

  
  •  

    EDU 206 - Introduction to Adolescent Education, 2 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 100 level EDU courses
    This course is an overview of adolescent education for students ages 12 through 21. Current issues confronting the secondary school will be addressed.

  
  •  

    EDU 207 - Planning Instruction and Guiding Young Children, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 100 level EDU courses and EDU 203  
    Corequisite(s): Must be taken concurrently with EDU 214 
    In this course, students will examine factors which are necessary to create responsive learning environments for young children. They will also learn to plan developmentally appropriate instruction and will consider the varied curricular domains of effective early childhood programs. This course will further introduce students to techniques for guiding, supporting, and encouraging young children’s positive behavior.

  
  •  

    EDU 210 - Classroom Dynamics: Environments, Families, and Community Partners, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all 100 level EDU courses
    Classroom Dynamics: Environments, Families and Community Partners will provide students with knowledge to develop the educational environment for students. The skills to develop a solid plan to communicate with parents and community partners will be highlighted, in order to learn how to garner support.

    A community-based field experience is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 211D - Exploring Education in a Diverse Society, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 131  and Sophomore standing
    The aim of the course is to sensitize teacher education candidates and other interested students to the differing needs of children/adolescents and to foster an exploration of their beliefs and experiences with regard to issues of diversity. Participants in the course will understand critical concepts of teaching and learning in a multi-cultural classroom. A field experience is required.

    This course meets the Writing Extension Core requirement.

  
  •  

    EDU 214 - Media Resources for the Education Professional, 2 credit hours


    Corequisite(s): Completion of 100 level EDU courses; Must be taken concurrently with EDU 201  or EDU 207  
    This course introduces and provides hand-on activities with audio, video, and on-line tools in an educational context. The successful candidate will complete the course with a portfolio of media and on-line work samples suitable for making instructional decisions and designing learning activities appropriate for pre-K-12 students and teacher presentations.

  
  •  

    EDU 221 - Language Development and Emergent Literacy, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 100 level EDU courses; & EDU 203 , EDU 204 .
    Students will study techniques, materials, and theories of language acquisition and early literacy development. Topics include language development, oral language instruction, and teaching strategies to support emerging readers and writers (ages 3-8).

  
  •  

    EDU 274 - Introduction to Students with Mild/Moderate Educational Needs, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 100 level EDU courses
    This course is a study of historical and current definition, characteristics, and needs of students with Mild/Moderate Educational Needs (ages 5-21), and how they change through the lifespan. Focus will be on academic, behavioral, and social assessment and interventions based on current research and inclusive, co-teaching models.

    A field experience is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 276 - Behavioral Management for Students with Mild/Moderate Educational Needs, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all 100 level EDU courses; & EDU 274  
    This course is a study of classroom management approaches for learners ages 5-21, including behaviorist, psychodynamic, environmental, and biophysical models with their legal and ethical implications. Baseline data collection, target behaviors, token economies, contracts and certificates, group processes, medical interventions, and classroom arrangements behavior management and intervention planning are discussed.

    A field experience is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 301 - Arts Integration in the Early Childhood Education Classroom, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all 100 & 200 level EDU courses; and either ART 102I  or MUL 172  
    This course introduces ECE students to the concepts of Art and Music integration in regular classroom instruction. Throughout the course students will learn techniques to integrate different art and music techniques into early childhood regular education curriculum to enhance lessons and improve student achievement and appreciation of the arts.

  
  •  

    EDU 310I - Education in Guatemala, 2 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Junior level status
    Students will explore the educational system of Guatemala. Students will prepare for their work in Guatemala by designing teaching strategies and a plan for teaching and modeling. Topics to be covered in the course will prepare the students to understand the history and current political status of the country.

  
  •  

    EDU 314 - 21st Century Classroom Technology, 1 credit hour


    Corequisite(s): Must be taken concurrently with methods course(s)
    The technology laboratory is delivered in the form of mini workshops and one-on-one facilitation. Candidates will be supported during their methods coursework and field experiences as they develop a range of skills to complete assignments and lessons that infuse and integrate technology.  The lab must be taken concurrently with the content methods course associated with the candidates’ major teaching field(s).

  
  •  

    EDU 315 - Second Language Acquisition & Pedagogy for the English Language Learner, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): EDU 211D  & Sophomore Standing.
    This course will provide an introduction to the psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics and issues relating to learning English as a Second Language. The course will also cover theories of Second Language Acquisition and various approaches to teaching English to speakers of other languages. A field experience is required.

  
  •  

    EDU 316 - Assessment & Evaluation Tools for the ESL Classroom, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): EDU 211D , EDU 315  
    In this course, enrolled students will discuss formative and summative assessments specific to the English Language Learner in the K12 classroom. Enrolled students will develop an understanding of how to assess or evaluate the English Language Learner’s progress in the development of his/her proficiency in both academic and social language. A field experience is required.

  
  •  

    EDU 323 - Processes & Inquiry in Science/Social Studies in Early Childhood, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all 100 and 200 level EDU courses
    Corequisite(s): Must be taken concurrently with EDU 330  & EDU 333  
    This course is based on an integrated approach to giving young children the opportunity to develop the skills and problem solving approaches needed to understand concepts in science and social studies. Students will learn to use hands-on, inquiry-based approaches to instruction in science and social studies.

    A field experience is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 330 - Assessment and Data Based Decision Making in Early Childhood Education, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all 100 and 200 level EDU courses.
    Corequisite(s): Must be taken concurrently with EDU 323  & EDU 333 .
    This course introduces students to assessment strategies appropriate for use in early childhood learning settings. Alternatives to formal standardized testing including naturalistic, authentic, and performance assessment will be investigated. The course addresses current issues relevant to assessment in early childhood education. Students will learn strategies of data-based decision making.

    A field experience is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 333 - Reading Instruction in Early Childhood Education, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all 100 and 200 level EDU courses.
    Corequisite(s): Must be taken concurrently with EDU 323  & EDU 330 .
    Students will study the techniques, materials and philosophical approaches to literacy instruction for children ages 3-8. This will include topics such as comprehension instruction, vocabulary development, emergent writing, motivation, and instruction for diverse learners (ELL).

    A field experience is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 334 - Diagnostic and Remedial Reading Methods, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all 100 and 200 level EDU courses; and either EDU 333  or EDU 343 .
    Corequisite(s): Must be taken concurrently with EDU 314 , EDU 337 .
    Students will study diagnostic and remedial techniques for teaching reading to students who are experiencing difficulty in reading. This course is designed for students preparing to teach in early childhood, middle childhood, and mild/moderate educational needs settings. This course meets the Quantitative Extension Core requirement.

    A field experience is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 337 - Mathematics Instruction in Early Childhood Education, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): MTH 113 ; Completion of all 100 and 200 level EDU courses.
    Corequisite(s): Must be taken concurrently with EDU 314 , EDU 334 .
    Students will study the methods and materials applicable to teaching mathematics to children ages 3-8. A problem-solving approach will be emphasized.

    A field experience is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 340 - Assessment and Data Literacy, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 100 ; Completion of all 100 and 200 level EDU courses.
    Students will study foundations of measurement, assessment, data analysis of student achievement in diverse settings. Students will develop skills in formative assessment, value added analysis, constructing grading systems, constructing mutiple types of assessments, and communicating assessment results.

    A field placement is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 343 - Literacy Instruction with Adolescents, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Middle Childhood students take EDU 201 , EDU 204 , EDU 205 , EDU 211D  & EDU 214 . Adolescent Young Adult students take EDU 201 , EDU 206  & EDU 214 .
    Students will study the techniques, materials, and philosophical approaches to reading instruction for students ages 8-14. Included are topics such as: reading comprehension, word identification, reading in the content areas, integrating literacy instruction across the curriculum, using literature to teach reading, assessment and teaching reading in diverse classrooms.

    A field experience is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 345 - Social Studies Instruction in Middle Childhood Education, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 100 ; Completion of all 100 and 200 level EDU courses.
    Students will study materials and teaching strategies applied to the social studies curriculum for students ages 10-14.

    A field experience is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 346 - Science/Health Instruction in Middle Childhood Education, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 100 ; Completion of all 100 and 200 level EDU courses.
    Students will study the methods and materials used in the science/health curriculum for students ages 10-14.

    A field experience is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 347 - Mathematics Instruction in Middle Childhood Education, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): MTH 111 ; MTH 112  or MTH 113 ; Completion of all 100 and 200 level EDU courses.
    Students will study the materials and teaching techniques applicable to teaching mathematics to students ages 10-14. A problem-solving approach will be emphasized.

    A field experience is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 348 - Reading in the Content Area, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 100 ; Completion of all 100 and 200 level EDU courses.
    This course is a study of strategies for teaching reading in the content areas. It is required for Middle Childhood, AYA, and Multi-Age majors.

    A field experience is required.
  
  •  

    EDU 349 - Literacy Assessment & Remediation for Adolescents, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 100 and 200 level EDU courses; & EDU 333  or EDU 343 .
    Students will study assessment and remediation techniques for teaching adolescents who are experiencing difficulty with reading and writing. This course is designed for students preparing to teach AYA English, Middle Childhood, or adolescents in Mild/Moderate Education.

    A field experience is required.
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 17