2018-2019 University Catalog 
    
    Aug 18, 2022  
2018-2019 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

History

  
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    HIS 151 - History of the United States I, 3 credit hours


    A comprehensive analysis of the origins and growth of American civilization. The first course covers the development of the United States from the discovery period to the end of the Civil War. The second course covers from 1865 to the present.

  
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    HIS 152 - History of the United States II, 3 credit hours


    A comprehensive analysis of the origins and growth of American civilization. The first course covers the development of the United States from the discovery period to the end of the Civil War. The second course covers from 1865 to the present.

  
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    HIS 170D - Diversity in America, 3 credit hours


    This course covers the issue of diversity in America from the colonial era to the present. Topics may include: racial diversity, national origins, women’s issues, differing creeds, and sexual orientation.

  
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    HIS 205I - History and the Environment: Global Perspectives, 3 credit hours


    This course examines how major events in world history have impacted the natural environment. Sample themes such as the agricultural revolution, the Columbian Exchange, industrialization, and global epidemics will tie together geography, history, and the environment.

     

  
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    HIS 221I - Europe: From Black Death to French Revolution, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 131  
    This course explores European history through the impact of the Black Death on medieval Europe, the changes brought about by the Renaissance, the discovery of the so-called “New World” and its consequences, the Protestant Reformation, the development of modern capitalism, the rise of the modern nation-state and absolute monarchies, and the era of Revolutions. Certain themes will become apparent throughout the course, such as the influence of religion in politics and conflict, nationalist rivalries, the growth of empire and modern commerce, and the development of Enlightenment thought.

  
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    HIS 222I - Europe: From Revolution to World War and Globalization, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 131  
    This course surveys the rise of modernity in Europe. Students explore the Napoleonic conquests, the Industrial Revolution, the economic and cultural aspects of imperialism and their impact on non-European civilizations, the causes and results of the two world wars, and the cultural developments of the post-war twentieth century.

  
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    HIS 227I - History of Africa, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course and ENG 131  
    This course provides a basic survey of African history. Attention will be given to the development of African kingdoms and their fall during the African colonial period. Particular emphasis is placed on the period of independence and the political, social, economic and cultural aspects of the modern states of Africa.

  
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    HIS 235I - Women in Western Civilization, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    A study of the role and impact of women on the development of Western society. Special emphasis is placed on the biographies of significant and influential women.

  
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    HIS 236I - Women in Asian Civilizations, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course or INT 200I  or ASN 100I 
    An introduction to the history of women’s roles in East Asia, India, and the Middle East. Special attention will be paid to religious and social factors and developments in the history of ideas that influence the position of women in these societies. No prior knowledge of Asian history is required.

  
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    HIS 245I - Survey of Russian History, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    This course is a one-semester survey of Russian history from the 800s to the present, treating the origins and expansion of the Russian state, interactions between state and society, Russia’s relations with the outside world, and the shifting fortunes of Russia’s minority peoples under Russian, Soviet, and post-Soviet rule.

  
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    HIS 250D - African-American History, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    This course will provide a survey of the historical, political, economic, social and cultural contributions of African-Americans in the U.S. from roots in Africa and colonial times to the present, and is organized around the premise: African-American history cannot be understood except in the broader context of American history; American history cannot be understood without African-American history. Throughout the course, when discussing significant national issues and events, the focus will be on the contributions of African-Americans and their roles in the development and history of the United States. The course will balance accounts of the actions of African-American leaders with examinations of the lives of ordinary men and women.

  
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    HIS 259 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    HIS 260(I,D) - Topics in History, 3-4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    A basic introduction to specific areas or fields of history.

  
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    HIS 267I - Vietnam War: Causes and Consequences, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    An in-depth, intensive study of the causes, impact and legacy of a seemingly endless struggle in Vietnam. Emphasizing the history and culture of Vietnam and utilizing lectures, readings, discussion and video material, the course will attempt to highlight the clash of cultures and sort out the blur of images which is the continuing legacy of Vietnam today.

  
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    HIS 288I - Islamic History 600-1800, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course or INT 200I 
    Explores the history of the early Islamic community, the Crusades, the “Golden Age” of Islam, and the Gunpowder Empires. Focuses on economic, intellectual, and cultural developments, and the geographical areas of the Middle East, North Africa, and India.

  
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    HIS 291I - History of East Asia I, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course or INT 200I  or ASN 100I 
    A survey of the history of East Asia (primarily China, Japan, Korea, and Mongolia) from ancient times to the rise of the Mongols, emphasizing the origins of statehood, interactions between state and society, relations among East Asian societies and between East Asia and the outside world, and the development of East Asian political, social, economic, and cultural institutions.


  
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    HIS 292I - History of East Asia II, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course or INT 200I  or ASN 100I 
    A survey of the history of East Asia (primarily China, Japan, Korea, and Mongolia) from the rise of the Mongols to the present, emphasizing interactions between state and society, the evolution of East Asian political, social, economic, and cultural institutions, relations among East Asian societies and between East Asia and the outside world, and the impact of imperialism and modernization.


  
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    HIS 321 - Classical Antiquity to the Fall of Rome, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level HIS course
    Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, the Hebrews and the Greeks, the heritage of Rome: this course explores the glories and travesties of the great civilizations of classical antiquity and their legacies in the modern world.

  
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    HIS 322I - Medieval Europe to the Black Death, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level HIS course
    From the rise of Christendom, this course explores the consolidation of European states, the age of chivalry and serfdom, of Celts and Vikings and Crusades and the rise of middle class commerce, up to the devastation of the Black Death.

  
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    HIS 323I - Enlightenment, French Revolution, and Napoleon, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    HIS 323I is an advanced study of the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and the Napoleonic Era. This course follows the philosophical developments of the Enlightenment, many of which formed the rhetorical basis for the events of the French Revolution, which deposed monarchy in favor of a republic. The course will conclude with an examination of the Napoleonic Era.

  
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    HIS 339I - History of War, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    A survey of Western warfare from antiquity to the present.

  
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    HIS 342I - World War I, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    The First World War (1914-1918) was the seminal event of the twentieth century. This course will cover the origins, progress, and consequences of the war. Special emphasis will be placed on the following topics: why the world went to war in 1914; why the people of the “civilized” nations killed each other on an unprecedented scale; how strategy, tactics, and weaponry evolved during the war; what was the social impact of the conflict; and how the war shaped the rest of the century.

  
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    HIS 344I - Early Russia, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course or INT 200I 
    An in-depth study of the history of Ancient and Mediaeval Russia from the pre-Slavic past to the early eighteenth century, stressing the evolution of Russia’s political, economic, social, and cultural institutions, popular challenges to political, cultural, and religious authority, and Russia’s expansion into a multiethnic state.

  
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    HIS 345I - Imperial Russia, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course or INT 200I 
    An in-depth study of the history of Russia from the eighteenth century to the last decades of Tsarist rule, with an emphasis upon relations between state and society, the formation of the Russian revolutionary tradition, Russia’s cultural and ethnic minorities under imperialism, and attempts to reform Russia’s political and social system.

  
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    HIS 346I - Modern Russia, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course or INT 200I 
    An in-depth study of the history of late Tsarist, Communist, and post-Communist Russia, emphasizing the collapse of the autocracy and the triumph of the revolution, the Russian experience in the First and Second World Wars, the changing experiences of the non-Russian minorities, the collapse of Communism, and the emergence of the post-Communist order.

  
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    HIS 349I - Modern Britain, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    An in-depth examination of British history since 1714, providing a more advanced and specialized study of topics such as the Hanoverian century, the rise of constitutionalism, the Victorian Age and the rise and fall of the British empire. Britain in the two world wars, the construction of the welfare state, Thatcherism, New Labour and the impact of the European Union are also explored.

  
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    HIS 350 - Colonial America, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    A study of the exploration, conquest, and settlement of the New World. Topics include the growth of Anglo-American society, the development of Anglo-Indian relations, the origins of slavery, and the causes and consequences of changes in British imperial policy.

  
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    HIS 351 - The American Revolution, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    A study of the causes, development, and consequences of the Revolutionary War. The course also covers the post-war developments that led to the creation and ratification of the Constitution.

  
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    HIS 352 - Jefferson-Jackson, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    A study of the United States from the Constitutional Convention of 1787 to the mid-nineteenth century. Topics will include the first and second political party systems, the War of 1812, westward expansion, slavery, reform movements, the transportation and communications revolutions, and the Mexican War.

  
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    HIS 353 - U.S. Civil War, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    A study of the causes and course of the Civil War, as well as an examination of the postwar Reconstruction era.

  
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    HIS 354 - U.S. Reform and War, 1876-1920, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    This course will provide an intensive examination of the period from the centennial year of 1876 to the presidential election of 1920. Emphasis will be placed on the interplay of political, social, and economic forces in the development of the United States into an industrial and world power. Topics will include the rise of industrial and urban America, the impact of immigration, the growth of organized labor, the emergence of the New South, cultural conflict and the technological transformation of society, Gilded Age politics and the crises of the 1890s, Progressivism and the rise of the regulatory state, the Spanish-American War and U.S. involvement in world affairs, the United States in World War I, and the post-war Red Scare.

  
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    HIS 355 - Modern America: 1920-1945, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    A study of the growth of the United States as an urban -industrial nation and consequent problems of economic power and political adjustment. The course highlights the growth of the United States as a world power. Topics discussed include the end of World War I, the Roaring Twenties, the agony of the Depression Thirties and World War II at home and abroad.

  
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    HIS 356 - Recent America: 1945-present, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    A study of domestic and foreign issues in America from 1945 to the present. In-depth analysis of major political, social and economic changes and adaptations. Emphasis is placed on change and continuity in domestic and foreign policies in the cold-war Forties, the “flat” Fifties, the “sick” Sixties, the “selfish” Seventies and the early Eighties.

  
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    HIS 359 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    HIS 360(I) - An In-depth Study of Topics in History, 3-4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course
    The topics will be supplementary to the material offered in 300-level courses, but taught in a more specific manner. This course can be taken more than once if the subject matter has changed.

  
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    HIS 370I - Colonial Latin America, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level HIS course
    Colonial Latin America was the meeting ground of three major civilizations: Native American, European, and African. This course will explore the history of this incredible region, from Pre-Colombian times to the outbreak of the liberal revolutions of the early 1800s that ultimately wrested the continent from Spanish and Portuguese control. Special emphasis will be placed on the formation of socioeconomic and racial categories in the Americas over the four centuries of Iberian rule.

  
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    HIS 371I - Modern Latin America, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course.
    A crucible of three major cultures – Native American, European, and African – the region of Latin America is a fascinating study in contrasts.  Some of the oldest democratic constitutions in the world were drafted in Latin America, yet the region still wrestles with the negative legacies of colonialism, imperialism, and feudal exploitation. This course will explore the history of this diverse region, from the liberal revolutions of the early 1800s that ended four centuries of Iberian colonial rule, to the problematic and protean present.

  
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    HIS 381I - The Arab-Israeli Conflicts, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course or INT 200I 
    An exploration of the Arab-Israeli conflicts from the beginning of Jewish settlement in Ottoman Palestine in the 1880s to the present time.

  
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    HIS 389I - The Modern Middle East, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): One 100-level history course or INT 200I 
    An introduction to the history of the Middle East in the 19th and 20th centuries. The dominant theme of the course is Middle Eastern peoples’ engagement with western ideas and their rediscovery of their own traditions as means to grapple with western political and economic domination. Topics include 19th century reformism (political, military, economic, and religious), economic dependency, Imperialism, Zionism, the Arab-Israeli conflict, Arab socialism and the rise to power of Saddam Hussein, the Iranian revolution, the rise of Islamic fundamentalist and militant groups.

  
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    HIS 459 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    HIS 461 - Historiography, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 131  and a minimum of 17 credit hours in history courses or consent of the instructor
    This course is designed to provide students with a knowledge of the history of writing history, including interpretations of major historical topics. The course also trains students in historical research methods and the writing of a research paper. Required of all history majors.

  
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    HIS 463(I) - Seminar in History, 2-4 credit hours


    Must have consent of the instructor.

  
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    HIS 491 - Senior Thesis, Credit hours to be arranged


    Prerequisite(s): Consent of Department. Interested students should contact Department Chairperson.
  
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    HIS 492 - Departmental Thesis/project, Credit hours to be arranged


    Prerequisite(s): Consent of Department. Interested students should contact Department Chairperson.

Honors

  
  
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    HON 070 - Internship, 1-4 credit hours


  
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    HON 170X - Honors Guided Internship, 1-3 credit hours


    In this guided internship course, students will serve as interns in the workplace and meet weekly to discuss readings and reflection relevant to their experiences at work. Placements could be in not-for-profit, for-profit, or educational organizations. Weekly reflection meetings with the faculty supervisor, a weekly journal, and a final experiential reflection essay are designed to solidify the student’s learning from this experience.

  
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    HON 200 - Interdisciplinary Honors Theme, 3-4 credit hours


    HON 200 is a course with an intentional perspective from two core schools (Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences). The themes range from the narrow to the broad. This interdisciplinary approach is intended to help the student understand how different disciplines address current problems, how thinking has evolved, and how to integrate modes of thinking across disciplines.

  
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    HON 250 - Special Topics, 1-4 credit hours


    Special Topics courses (Example: Problem Solving, Constructing Scientific Knowledge, Freedom vs. Equality, Ethical Clashes)

  
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    HON 259 - Faculty Student Collaboration, 3 credit hours


    Through the FSC courses Baldwin Wallace University encourages and supports faculty-student collaborators as they tackle the inquiry-based, unscripted problems typical of research, scholarship and other creative endeavors. These courses facilitate the engagement of students and faculty in the deep learning required for the creation, practice, and sharing of knowledge or works in their area of professional study. Enrollment in the course is competitive and requires that collaborating students and faculty submit a project proposal.

  
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    HON 350 - Seminar in Honors, 1-4 credit hours


    Advanced Special Topics courses. Junior or Senior status required.

  
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    HON 359 - Faculty Student Collaboration, 3 credit hours


    Through the FSC courses Baldwin Wallace University encourages and supports faculty-student collaborators as they tackle the inquiry-based, unscripted problems typical of research, scholarship and other creative endeavors. These courses facilitate the engagement of students and faculty in the deep learning required for the creation, practice, and sharing of knowledge or works in their area of professional study. Enrollment in the course is competitive and requires that collaborating students and faculty submit a project proposal.

  
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    HON 459 - Faculty Student Collaboration, 3 credit hours


    Through the FSC courses Baldwin Wallace University encourages and supports faculty-student collaborators as they tackle the inquiry-based, unscripted problems typical of research, scholarship and other creative endeavors. These courses facilitate the engagement of students and faculty in the deep learning required for the creation, practice, and sharing of knowledge or works in their area of professional study. Enrollment in the course is competitive and requires that collaborating students and faculty submit a project proposal.

  
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    HON 491 - Honors Thesis, 1-4 credit hours


    This Honors Program course will be offered on an independent study basis and is suggested for students in their junior or senior year. The topic must be approved by the Director of the Honors Program.


Humanities

  
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    HUM 150I - Humans & The Earth: Can We Coexist?, 3 credit hours


    This team taught course examines global environmental issues, such as climate, energy, development, biodiversity, and population from interdisciplinary perspectives. These perspectives will vary depending upon the academic disciplines of the three faculty members who instruct the course. Students in the old core will satisfy three core credits, either in the sciences (BIO 150I ), the social sciences (ECN 150I /POL 150I ), or the humanities (HUM 150I) and an International course requirement. Offered as SUS 150I , BIO 150I , HUM 150I, ECN 150I , and POL 150I  in the new core, the course satisfies the Interdisciplinary requirement and is counted towards the International requirement. Humans and the Earth is also a required course for the Sustainability Program major and minor. It may be counted towards the requirements of the Sustainability Program Certificate .

  
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    HUM 200 - Global Citizenship: Succeeding in an Intercultural World, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 131  
    What does it mean to live in this intercultural world? How can we make sense of ourselves, our relationship to others, and our relationship to nature in the midst of cultural difference, violence, global poverty, the destruction of the ecosystem, and the pervasive hope that we can make our world a better place for all people?  In this course, students and faculty engage with current events and the ideas of influential thinkers from various liberal arts disciplines; together, we explore ways of responding to some complex issues facing us all today.

  
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    HUM 200H - Global Citizenship: Succeeding in an Intercultural World, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 131  
    What does it mean to live in this intercultural world? How can we make sense of ourselves, our relationship to others, and our relationship to nature in the midst of cultural difference, violence, global poverty, the destruction of the ecosystem, and the pervasive hope that we can make our world a better place for all people?  In this course, students and faculty engage with current events and the ideas of influential thinkers from various liberal arts disciplines; together, we explore ways of responding to some complex issues facing us all today.

  
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    HUM 250IE - The Art of Travel, 4 credit hours


    Notes: Open only to participants in the Seminar in Europe Program.

    Study of, and development of skills in, travel journaling, narratives, drawing, photography, and digital publishing. Required of all SIE participants.

  
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    HUM 270X - Career Connections for Humanities Majors, 1-3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore Standing, 3.0 GPA, & Application to Professor- resume, cover letter, recommendation.
    A guided internship in business and not-for-profit organizations with weekly meetings with the faculty supervisor to reflect, read relevant materials, and begin to chart out a career path.

  
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    HUM 285I - Intercultural Communication, 3 credit hours


    This course, taught in English by faculty of the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, will complement the basic familiarity with intercultural communication. The goal is to analyze difficulties in communicating across cultural boundaries, misunderstandings arising from cultural differences and techniques for living and working successfully in an intercultural setting with a stress on international differences. The course utilizes film analyses, critical incidents, and other experiential learning techniques. Special focus will be on intercultural theories including monochronic vs. polychronic time orientation, an expansion of the basic value orientations, the interconnection of language and culture in both verbal and non-verbal communication and on studies of intercultural matters in specific contexts. It is required of foreign languages majors, but is appropriate for any student interested in cultural studies, those wishing to engage in international travel, study abroad or in working and living in an increasingly global society.

  
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    HUM 287IE - The Seminar in Europe, 3 credit hours


    Notes: Open only to participants in the Seminar in Europe Program.

    Introduces current political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic trends for destination countries in the Seminar in Europe Program, as well as practical information concerning safety, travel, customs, and vocabulary. Required of all SIE participants. See Seminar in Europe.

    Graded: S/U

International Studies

  
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    INT 050I - Independent Study, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    INT 070I - Internship, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    INT 200I - Introduction to International Studies, 3 credit hours


    Notes: Open to seniors with instructor permission. This course is not open to entering freshmen. Students will have the option to use second language skills to research selected assignments.

    This course studies how individuals acquire their cultural, national and state identifications and how these varied identifications complicate coping with a variety of global challenges arising from increasing interdependence and, through case studies and simulations, challenges students to adopt different perspectives and experience the possible cooperation or conflict which results. It provides an introduction to a global community in transition in the post-Cold War world and to the interdisciplinary approach which characterizes the study of international affairs.

  
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    INT 250I - Security, Technology and Threat Assessment, 3 credit hours


    Notes: Open to seniors with instructor permission. This course is not open to entering freshmen. Students will have the option to use second language skills to
    research selected assignments.

    This introduction to security analysis will provide an overview of security threats ranging from the traditional definition focused on war to an enlarged conception of human security and existentialist threat assessment encompassing a broader range of issues including the environment and health. Attention will be directed at the challenges of managing complex interdependent systems of governance and associated risks of information analysis under conditions of advancing technology. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the overlap in types of security threats, the importance of applying different perspectives and related information and management issues which arise in developing appropriate responses.

  
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    INT 259 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    INT 263I - Special Topics, 1-3 credit hours


    An examination of selected topics in the field of international studies. May be repeated if topics are different.

    Semesters Offered: Not offered every year.

  
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    INT 359 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    INT 363I - Seminar in International Studies or National Security, 3 credit hours


    An upper-level seminar dealing with topics not covered elsewhere in the curriculum.

    Semesters Offered: Not offered every year.

  
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    INT 390 - Preparing for Post-BW, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior Standing International Studies Majors Only.
    This one credit workshop will help students analyze their academic and co-curricular experiences in ways that help them develop post-graduation plans for graduate school, law school, or employment. Students are encouraged to take this during the fall of their junior year.

  
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    INT 459 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    INT 463I - Special Topics Capstone Seminar, 3 credit hours


    Notes: Recommended Preq: INT 200I POL 211I  or POL 221I .

    An integrative interdisciplinary capstone seminar which draws on at least two of the disciplines which comprise the International Studies and National Security majors to analyze a contemporary topic of global significance. Consult the International Studies section of the course schedule for topics and scheduling information. INT-463I “America in the World” is recommended for those in International Studies. “Security in the 21st Century” is recommended for those in National Security.

  
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    INT 491 - Senior Thesis, Credit hours to be arranged


    The Senior Thesis gives juniors and seniors the opportunity to do intensive research on a particular topic of global significance. Students develop their study under the direct supervision of a faculty member as approved by the head of the department or program in which the study will be done. The departmental thesis/project is intended to afford students an opportunity to engage in a study of a significant field of knowledge, to carry on original investigation when possible, and to further develop their abilities of self-expression.

  
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    INT 492 - Departmental Thesis Project, Credit hours to be arranged


    The Departmental Thesis/Project gives juniors and seniors the opportunity to do intensive work on a particular topic of global significance. Students develop their study under the direct supervision of a faculty member as approved by the head of the department or program in which the study will be done. The departmental thesis/project is intended to afford students an opportunity to engage in a study of a significant field of knowledge, to carry on original investigation when possible, and to further develop their abilities of self-expression.


Italian

  
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    ITL 101 - Elementary Italian I, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): None. Appropriate course for beginners. Students with more than two years of high school Italian must have special permission of the instructor to register for ITL 101.
    An introduction to basic Italian vocabulary, pronunciation and grammar. Students complete the first half of the elementary Italian textbook.

  
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    ITL 102 - Elementary Italian II, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ITL 101  or equivalent.
    ITL 102 assumes some active knowledge of basic Italian and builds on the skills taught in ITL 101 , completing the elementary textbook.


Latin American Studies

  
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    LAM 200 - Understanding Latin America, 3 credit hours


    The course immerses students into Latin American studies by introducing them to the history, society, politics and culture of the region through a cross-disciplinary and multinational approach.


Master of Arts in Management

  
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    MAM 591 - Master of Arts in Management Boot Camp, 1 credit hour


    An intensive academic period during which students complete a personal self assessment, acquire business-related personal skills, obtain general information on business administration, and complete a research project. An assessment component is also part of this course. The course meets on three distinct occasions; for three consecutive weeks in the summer and one week at the end of the fall and spring semesters.

    Graded: Graded S/U.
  
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    MAM 592 - The Accountant’s Perspective, 2 credit hours


    An overview of the accounting principles in business. The concepts of financial accounting, managerial accounting, financial statements, and their roles in informing top management will be covered. Pedagogical examples will be drawn from eight different types of businesses.

  
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    MAM 593 - The Finance Manager’s Perspective, 2 credit hours


    An overview of the finance principles in business. Concepts of time-value of money, capital budgeting, financial markets, and international trade and their roles in helping top management reach decisions will be covered. Pedagogical examples will be drawn from eight different types of businesses.

  
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    MAM 594 - The Economist’s Perspective, 2 credit hours


    An overview of economics principles as they apply to business management. Concepts of micro-economics, macro-economics, international economics and their roles in informing top management decisions will be covered. Pedagogical examples will be drawn from eight different types of businesses.

  
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    MAM 595 - The Marketer’s Perspective, 2 credit hours


    An overview of marketing principles in business. Concepts of market, marketing mix, positioning, market research and consumer behavior, and their roles in informing top management’s decisions will be covered. Pedagogical examples will be drawn from eight different types of businesses.

  
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    MAM 596 - The Operations Manager’s Perspective, 2 credit hours


    An introduction to the tools of operations management and management science. Dependent-demand inventory management (MRP, DRP), independent-demand inventory management, forecasting, supply-chain operations in general, and their roles in supporting top management decisions will be covered. Pedagogical examples will be drawn from eight different types of businesses.

  
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    MAM 597 - The Lawyer’s Perspective, 2 credit hours


    An overview of legal and ethical principles in a business environment. Concepts of contracts, regulations, insurance, and ethics as they apply to corporate decisions will be covered. Pedagogical examples will be drawn from eight different types of businesses.

  
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    MAM 598 - The Manager’s Perspective, 2 credit hours


    An overview of organizational management principles. Concepts of planning, leading, organizing, controlling, as well as organizational behavior and human resources in business organizations will be covered.
    Pedagogical examples will be drawn from eight different types of businesses.

  
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    MAM 599 - The Strategic Manager’s Perspective, 2 credit hours


    An overview of strategic management principles. Concepts of strategy setting, goals and objectives, mission, policy, and long-term planning in a business organization will be covered. Pedagogical examples will be drawn from eight different types of businesses.


Mathematics

  
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    MTH 021 - Refresher Algebra, 2 credit hours


    This course provides remediation for those students lacking a thorough understanding of basic algebra. This course may be repeated until the student passes the placement exam that is prerequisite to most entry-level mathematics courses. Credits are not applicable toward the minimum credit requirement for graduation.

    Graded: S/U
  
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    MTH 050 - Independent Study, 1-4 credit hours


  
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    MTH 070 - Internship, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    MTH 101 - Mathematics Modeling & Quantitative Analysis, 3 credit hours


    The course takes a numerical and modeling approach to the analysis of contextual-based mathematics with a de-emphasis on algebraic manipulations. Students utilize both paper-and-pencil and current technologies to further develop quantitative reasoning. Topics may include collecting, organizing, and interpreting sets of univariate data, fitting functions and graphs to bivariate data including linear and non-linear models, problem-solving, decision-making, probability and statistics. The focus is activity-based with a high-level of student engagement.

  
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    MTH 105 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of high school Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry are prerequisites for all Mathematics courses.
    An introductory course designed to promote the understanding of basic statistical and probability concepts. Topics to be studied include descriptive statistics, probability of finite sample spaces, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals and parameter estimation.

  
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    MTH 108 - Biostatistics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of high school Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry are prerequisites for all Mathematics courses.
    An introductory course in statistics for the biological and health sciences covering descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, and analysis of variance.

  
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    MTH 111 - Mathematics for Early and Middle Childhood Teachers, Part I, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of high school Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry are prerequisites for all Mathematics courses.
    Open to early and middle childhood majors only. A systematic presentation of elementary mathematics for those who are preparing to teach early and middle childhood. The course provides an overall view of the number system, emphasizing ideas and concepts rather than routine drill. The following topics are surveyed: evolution of the number system, logic and sets, elementary number theory, rules for algebraic manipulation, and mathematical systems.

  
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    MTH 112 - Mathematics for Middle Childhood Teachers, Part II, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): MTH 111  or permission of the instructor. Students who have not successfully completed a high school geometry course should make special arrangements for tutoring in geometry prior to enrolling in this course.
    Open to middle childhood majors only. A continuation of MTH 111 , this course examines the ideas of rational and irrational numbers, discrete mathematics, counting theory, basic probability, and basic statistics.

  
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    MTH 113 - Mathematics for Early Childhood Teachers, Part II, 2 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): MTH 111  or permission of the instructor. Students who have not successfully completed a high school geometry course should make special arrangements for tutoring in geometry prior to enrolling in this course.
    Open to early childhood majors only. A continuation of MTH 111 , this course examines the ideas and concepts of geometry and measurements. Included are a study of measurement in one, two and three dimensions, properties and classification of two and three dimensional geometric objects and basic statistical displays.

  
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    MTH 115 - Geometry for Middle Childhood Teachers, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): MTH 111  or permission of instructor
    A review of the basics of Euclidean geometry will be followed by a study of empirical geometry, some finite geometries, geometric constructions and measurement activities. The activity and manipulation approach to geometry will be emphasized throughout. Required for middle childhood education majors with a math concentration.

  
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    MTH 118 - Algebraic Thinking Through Modeling, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): MTH 111  and MTH 112  (grade C- or higher in both)
    An exploration of algebraic ideas involving representation, organizing data and looking for patterns, generalizing findings into a rule, and using findings to make predictions. Through the use of modeling, problem solving, and exploring the multiple uses of algebraic letters students are enabled to see the interconnections among algebraic topics from an advanced perspective.

  
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    MTH 120 - Applied College Mathematics, 4 credit hours


    Notes: Admission to the 4 credit hour version is through departmental approval.

    This course is designed for freshmen and deals with the fundamental mathematical tools frequently applied in the natural, management and social sciences. Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential functions, linear systems, linear programming, mathematics of finance, and statistics. (All topics are approached with a view toward applications.) The 4 credit hour version includes some remedial topics.

  
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    MTH 121 - Applied College Mathematics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of high school Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry are prerequisites for all Mathematics courses.

    Students are required to have achieved an ACT Math Score of 22 or higher, a SAT Math Section Score of 520 or higher (if taken prior to March 2016), a SAT Math Section Score of 550 or higher (if taken after March 2016), a SAT Math Test Score of 27.5 or higher, or a score of 80% or higher on the Baldwin Wallace mathematics placement exam.
    This course is designed for freshmen and deals with the fundamental mathematical tools frequently applied in the natural, management and social sciences. Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential functions, linear systems, linear programming, mathematics of finance, and statistics. (All topics are approached with a view toward applications.)

  
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    MTH 140 - Precalculus Mathematics, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of high school Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry are prerequisites for all Mathematics courses.

    Students are required to have achieved an ACT Math Score of 22 or higher, a SAT Math Section Score of 520 or higher (if taken prior to March 2016), a SAT Math Section Score of 550 or higher (if taken after March 2016), a SAT Math Test Score of 27.5 or higher, or a score of 80% or higher on the Baldwin Wallace mathematics placement exam.
    A University-level review of algebra, trigonometry and analytic geometry. The course is designed to prepare students for the study of calculus. A graphing calculator is required, and will be used extensively.

 

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