2018-2019 University Catalog 
    
    Oct 20, 2020  
2018-2019 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Astronomy

  
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    AST 111 - Astronomy of the Stars, 3 credit hours


    The student is assumed to have had high school mathematics through algebra An introductory lecture course dealing primarily objects beyond the solar system. The course briefly discusses the historical development of astronomy, telescopes, and spectroscopy. The major topics covered are the birth and death of stars, the structure and evolution of galaxies, exotic objects such as pulsars, white dwarfs, black holes, radio galaxies, quasars and some of the current theories of cosmology. No Lab.

  
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    AST 121 - Astronomy of the Solar System, 3 credit hours


    The student is assumed to have had high school mathematics through algebra An introductory lecture dealing primarily with objects in the solar system. The course briefly covers the methods and historical development of astronomy. Drawing on the most recent data from space probes and the Hubble, the course’s major topics include the structure of the sun, the structure and remarkable features of the planets and their moons, and solar system debris such as comets and asteroids. No Lab.

  
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    AST 131 - Exploratory Astronomy, 4 credit hours


    The student is assumed to have had high school mathematics through algebra An introductory lecture-laboratory course dealing with topics in solar system and stellar astronomy. Lab exercises emphasize topics such as the nature and properties of light, optics, heat, mechanics, astronomical data analysis and/or computer simulations. Lab included.

  
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    AST 170 - Observational Astronomy Lab, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite/Corequisite: AST 111  or AST 121  or equivalent

    An introductory laboratory course that explores the universe and the practice of basic scientific principles through observations of the night sky, using the naked eye, binoculars and small telescopes, and the large telescope of the Burrell Memorial Observatory. Topics also include the properties of light and the principles and design of telescopes and optical instruments.

  
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    AST 200 - Science, 1-4 credit hours


    A study of a topic in science which may involve an interdisciplinary approach. Course content is determined by the department under whose auspices the course is offered. AST 200 is not offered on a regular basis.

  
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    AST 259 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    AST 359 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    AST 459 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    AST 491 - Departmental Thesis/project, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    AST 492 - Departmental Thesis/project, Credit hours to be arranged



Biology

  
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    BIO 050 - Independent Study, 1-4 credit hours


  
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    BIO 070 - Internship, 1-12 credit hours


    Notes: Up to twelve hours may count toward graduation, but only four hours may count toward the biology major.

  
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    BIO 101 - Human Biology, 3 credit hours


    Notes: For non-biology majors only; does not count toward biology major or minor

    A non-laboratory scientific study of fundamental biological principles as they pertain to the human condition.

  
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    BIO 110 - Biology for the Citizen, 4 credit hours


    Notes: For non-biology majors only; does not count toward biology major or minor

    A lecture-laboratory inquiry into selected biological topics of interest to the intelligent citizen.

  
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    BIO 111 - Field Biology, 4 credit hours


    Notes: For non-biology majors only; does not count toward biology major or minor

    An ecological approach to the study of life with emphasis on the outdoor world and peoples place in it. A field and laboratory course emphasizing the natural history of selected aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems.

  
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    BIO 121 - Principles Of Biology I, 4 credit hours


    A lecture-laboratory survey of cellular and molecular biological principles. Topics include the chemistry of living cells; cellular structure, function, and metabolism; and the principles of inheritance.

  
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    BIO 122 - Principles Of Biology II, 4 credit hours


    A lecture-laboratory survey of macro-level biological principles. Topics include evolution, diversity, classification, ecology, and environmental science.

  
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    BIO 150I - Humans & The Earth: Can We Coexist?, 3 credit hours


    This team taught course examines global environmental issues, such as climate, energy, development, biodiversity, and population from interdisciplinary perspectives. These perspectives will vary depending upon the academic disciplines of the three faculty members who instruct the course. Students in the old core will satisfy three core credits, either in the sciences (BIO 150I), the social sciences (ECN 150I /POL 150I ), or the humanities (HUM 150I ) and an International course requirement. Offered as SUS 150I , BIO 150I, HUM 150I , ECN 150I , and POL 150I  in the new core, the course satisfies the Interdisciplinary requirement and is counted towards the International requirement. Humans and the Earth is also a required course for the Sustainability Program major and minor. It may be counted towards the requirements of the Sustainability Program Certificate .

  
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    BIO 163 - Freshman Biology Seminar, .5 credit hour


    Notes: All biology majors must take this course during their first year of study at Baldwin Wallace.

    This course serves as an introduction to the opportunities, expectations, and responsibilities that result from choosing a career in the biological sciences. The course consists of discussions, outside speakers, assessment testing, and presentations given by senior biology majors.

    Graded: S/U
  
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    BIO 180 - Introduction to Biotechnology, 3 credit hours


    Notes: For non-biology majors only; does not count toward biology major or minor An introduction to the science of biotechnology.

    Topics to be covered include a survey of the fundamentals of proteins and DNA, the basic procedures employed in working with these biological molecules, and the construction of recombinant DNA and transgenic animals (“genetic engineering”). The class will also explore the societal impact of biotechnology.

  
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    BIO 200 - Science, 2-4 credit hours


    A study of a topic in science that involves an interdisciplinary approach. The department under whose auspices the course is offered determines course content.

  
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    BIO 203 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I, 4 credit hours


    A lecture-laboratory course covering cells, tissues and the skeletal, muscular, nervous, sensory, and respiratory systems of the human body. Prosected human cadavers, organs and skeletons will be studied in the laboratory portion of the course.

  
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    BIO 204 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 203  
    A continuation of BIO 203 , covering the cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, immune, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the human body. Prosected human cadavers and organs, histology, and electrophysiology, will be studied in the laboratory portion of the course.

  
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    BIO 210IE - Tropical Ecology with Lab, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
    This course explores ecological principles as demonstrated by interactions among tropical organisms and their environments. The laboratory component of the course involves field work done in a tropical setting.

  
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    BIO 211 - Genetics, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): “C-” or better in BIO 121  and BIO 122 .
    A lecture-laboratory study of classical, cellular and population genetics.

  
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    BIO 212 - Microbiology, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): “C-” or better in BIO 121  and BIO 122 .
    A lecture-laboratory study of microorganisms, particularly bacteria. The relationship of these microorganisms to humans is emphasized.

  
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    BIO 221 - General Zoology, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): “C-” or better in BIO 121  and BIO 122 .
    A lecture-laboratory survey of the most common taxa of the animal kingdom.

  
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    BIO 222 - General Botany, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): “C-” or better in BIO 121  and BIO 122 .
    A lecture-laboratory study of the plant kingdom with emphasis on the flowering plants.

  
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    BIO 259 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    BIO 263 - Sophomore Biology Seminar, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): “C-” or better in BIO 121  and BIO 122 . Biology majors must take this course during their sophomore year. Transfer biology majors must take this course the next semester after they take BIO 121 /BIO 122  if they are sophomores or higher when they transfer in. Otherwise, they must take this course their sophomore year.
    Students in this course will learn how to use and interpret the scientific literature, and how to research, develop and deliver a talk on a current topic in Biology.

  
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    BIO 281 - Environmental Biology, 4 credit hours


    This course introduces environmental processes and the influence of human activities upon them. We will focus on understanding how ecosystems and the populations of organisms within them function and interact. We will also examine human dependence, interaction, and impacts on ecosystems. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues.

  
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    BIO 301 - Cell Biology, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 211  
    This lecture course provides a detailed analysis of the eukaryotic cell and its components. Topics that will be covered include chaperones, proteasomes, the cytoskeleton, the flagellum, nuclear transport, mitochondria, protein trafficking, cell cycle, and cell signaling.

  
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    BIO 308 - Evolution of Animal Behavior, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): “C-” or better in BIO 221 
    Animal Behavior is a broad field, encompassing topics as diverse as the neural basis of perception in insects, to issues such as whether patterns of deviant human behavior like murder and rape conform to evolutionary explanations. This course is a survey of the function, development and evolution of behavior. We will start with an analysis of the mechanics of behavior, including genetic influences, development, and physiological aspects. We will then discuss the ecological significance of behavioral patterns and the adaptations of behavior. Discussion sections will develop your critical reading and thinking skills. Each week we will discuss seminal and/or current papers on the topic covered in class that week. Laboratory exercises are designed to give a hands-on experience designing experiments, observing patterns, making hypotheses, data analysis and interpretation.

    A weekend field trip is required
  
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    BIO 309 - Vertebrate Natural History, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 221  
    A lecture-laboratory-field study of the evolution and ecology of vertebrate animals.

    A weekend field trip is required
  
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    BIO 310 - Evolution, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 121 , BIO 122 
    A lecture-laboratory-field study of the fundamental principles of organic evolution.

  
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    BIO 311 - Conservation Biology, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 . A weekend field trip is required.
    This class examines the major biological approaches and ecological principles upon which conservation are based and applied. Course topics include the history of the conservation movement, biodiversity, extinctions, population modeling, habitat fragmentation, invasive species, endangered species, conservation genetics, economics, government policy and regulation, restoration ecology and social science elements of conservation strategies designed to conserve diversity. There is a mandatory overnight field trip.

  
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    BIO 313 - Ecology, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 121 , BIO 122 
    A laboratory-field study of the concepts of ecology. Representative aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems will be studied.

  
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    BIO 314 - Molecular Ecology, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): “C-” or better in BIO 211 . BIO 212  is also recommended.
    Molecular ecology is a young and exciting field that is taking advantage of the rapid development of new techniques in molecular genetics as well as advances in the theoretical and statistical approaches to interpreting the wealth of molecular data now available. Essentially, molecular ecology describes the dynamics of evolutionary change at the molecular level. Specifically, molecular ecology employs variation in nucleic acid and/or proteins to answer questions involving organismal behavior, kinship, populations and communities of organisms and phylogenies. The laboratory will be a hands-on introduction to the standard genetic markers computational techniques culminating in an independent project. After an introduction to some of the techniques and methods, you will be conducting your own independent project in the field. You will be responsible for choosing a study system, collection of tissue samples, extraction of genetic material, and assays of genetic material by one or more molecular markers.

  
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    BIO 322 - Plant Evolution, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 122 , BIO 222  or permission of instructor
    Plants have diversified into over 400,000 species that dominate all terrestrial habitats, support all other organisms, and sustain human life by supplying oxygen, foods, drugs, fuels, and fibers. This course focuses on the evolutionary patterns and processes shaping the astonishing array of adaptations across the plant kingdom. Through discussions of primary literature, field trips, and lab activities, students build their understanding of systematics research, skills in plant identification, familiarity with local flora, and appreciation of plant diversity.

  
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    BIO 330 - Gross Anatomy, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): “C-” or better in BIO 121  and BIO 122 .
    This is a lecture-laboratory course in the gross structures of the human body, in which a detailed, regional approach is used. Student dissection of human cadavers, as well as the study of skeletons and organs will be performed in the laboratory.

  
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    BIO 331 - Developmental Biology, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): “C-” or better in BIO 211  or consent of instructor.
    A lecture-laboratory course emphasizing the processes and concepts of embryonic development at the cellular, tissue, and organismal levels. A large part of this course is concerned with the biochemical, cellular, and molecular aspects of developmental biology.

  
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    BIO 332 - Histology, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): “C-” or better in BIO 121  and BIO 122 , or BIO 203  and BIO 204 
    A lecture-laboratory study of the microscopic structure of the human body. All organ systems will be covered. Detailed consideration is given to the manner in which cells are organized into tissues and tissues are organized into organs. Slides of mammalian tissues and organs will be studied in the laboratory portion of the course.

  
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    BIO 333 - Human Physiology, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): “C-” or better in BIO 121  and BIO 122 .
    A lecture-laboratory study of the fundamental processes responsible for the normal function of the cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Initial emphasis is given to physiological processes common to all cells of the body. Essential concepts of physiology at the organ and system level are then presented.

  
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    BIO 334 - Invertebrate Natural History, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): “C-” or better in BIO 221 
    A laboratory-field study of the ecology, behavior and importance of invertebrate animals. Special emphasis is given to insects and marine organisms.

  
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    BIO 336 - Molecular Biology, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): “C-” or better in BIO 211  is required and BIO 212  is recommended
    A lecture-laboratory study of some of the major techniques and applications in molecular biology.

  
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    BIO 337 - Plant Physiology, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 222 
    A lecture-laboratory study of the mechanisms employed by plants to solve the problems of life on land. Discussion of classic and current papers from the literature is included. Major topics covered are stress physiology, growth and development, and photosynthesis. The cellular and molecular basis for plant function is explored. The implications of plants’ physiological adaptations in ecology and agriculture are emphasized.

  
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    BIO 341 - Immunology, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): “C-” or better in BIO 121  and BIO 122  are required. BIO 211  and BIO 212  are recommended.
    A lecture-laboratory study of innate and acquired immune responses.

  
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    BIO 351 - Head & Neck Anatomy and Facial Reconstruction, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): At least Junior status
    This is a detailed study of the structure of the head & neck and the forensic reconstruction using human skulls. Detailed concepts of soft and hard tissue structure, facial esthetics, as well as basic facial development and aging are taught. The course consists of both lecture and laboratory portions. The lecture portion deals mostly with general principles and concepts. In the laboratory, the student participates in practical examination of cadaver specimens, the clinical examination of the head and neck, and the facial reconstruction using sculpting clay applied to skulls. Artistic experience is not required.

  
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    BIO 359 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    BIO 363 - Biology Seminar, 0 credit hours


    This course consists of attending the senior biology seminar (BIO 463 ) and evaluating the presentations.

    Graded: S/U
  
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    BIO 365 - Ecology Field Studies, 2 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor
    A field and classroom study of a particular ecosystem. A major component of the course will be an extensive field trip that will take place during or after the semester in which the course is offered.

    Graded: S/U
  
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    BIO 405 - Advanced Topics In Biology, 1-4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): A C- or better in BIO 121  & BIO 122 .
    A single topic will be addressed each time the course is offered, but topics chosen may differ.

  
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    BIO 422 - Field Botany, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 222  
    Field Botany is a field based course that meets once a week for an off campus trip.  In this course students will develop familiarity with flowering herbaceous species and with tree species of NE Ohio.  They will gain skill in using field guides to identify unknown species, will learn characteristics of common plant families, and will learn some of the natural history of our local flora.

  
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    BIO 459 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    BIO 463 - Senior Biology Seminar, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 263  with a grade of C- or better
    Students enrolled in this course will give an oral presentation to the faculty and students of the Department on a previously approved biological topic that they have researched. They will write a research paper on the same topic.

  
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    BIO 491 - Departmental Thesis/project, Credit hours to be arranged



Business Administration

  
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    BUS 050I - Independent Study, 1-4 credit hours


  
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    BUS 070X - Internship, 1-12 credit hours


  
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    BUS 170 - Explorations in Healthcare Careers, 1 credit hour


    This course provides a general exploration and evaluation of career opportunities in the field of healthcare management. The course will help prepare students for the internship search process and provide preparation to guide later career decisions.

  
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    BUS 208 - Introduction to Business, 3 credit hours


    This course provides an introduction to the role of business in modern society, its responsibilities and obligations, existing forms and functions, and projected changes and their effect on society. Not open to students who have taken BUS 305 .

  
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    BUS 213 - Accounting & Finance Essentials, 3 credit hours


    This is an introductory course designed to emphasize the fundamentals of financial literacy by acquainting students with the basic accounting process and essential principles of finance. The focus will be on understanding the financial impacts of decisions made in every area of a business as they relate to various business organizations.

  
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    BUS 215 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship, 3 credit hours


    This overview course will give students an awareness of the skills, knowledge and abilities needed to be a successful entrepreneur. An objective of the course is to develop students’ ability to become opportunity-focused and recognize their own entrepreneurial potential. Students will examine a framework that views entrepreneurship as a process that emphasizes the individual, the environment, the organization. Topics such as entrepreneurship, family businesses, social entrepreneurship, and innovation will be explored.

  
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    BUS 243 - Personal Finance, 3 credit hours


    This course studies the principles of personal finance with an emphasis on personal taxes, cash and savings instruments, consumer loans, stock and bond investments, real estate, insurance, and retirement planning.

  
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    BUS 259 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    BUS 263 - Seminar, 1-3 credit hours


    Sophomore-level seminars are open to all students who have completed listed prerequisites. Seminars study a specified current business topic and may be taken more than once for credit provided the topic or subject area is different.

  
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    BUS 290H - Fire Hoses & Teacups, 3 credit hours


    An introductory research methods course designed to introduce the business student to foundational research skills and apply these skills to specific research topics. In this course, students will identify a research problem, complete background research, read published articles, summarize the findings, and develop their professional writing and presentation skills.  The ability to take a fire hose of information and distil it into a teacup report will be a focus of this course!

  
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    BUS 305 - Introduction to Management, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 30 credit hours
    This course examines the leadership activities of managers within organizations in various environments. It also analyzes the functions of management from a holistic or systems perspective with emphasis on behavioral interaction and integration to create organizational effectiveness. Students apply knowledge acquired to successfully meet individual and organizational challenges.

  
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    BUS 310I - Introduction to International Business, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore status or BUS 208 .
    This course is designed to give students an opportunity to become familiar with the particularities of conducting business in an international environment, by giving them the theoretical and practical foundations necessary to study this discipline in greater detail.

  
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    BUS 315 - Managing a Growing Venture, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 330  or AMG 301  
    This course helps students understand the different functional areas involved in managing and growing an entrepreneurial enterprise. Students will gain a greater understanding of the interdependencies within an organization. Topics such as hiring employees, guerrilla marketing, networking, legal forms of an organization, relationship-building, advisory boards, and venture capital are explored, and financial issues confronting entrepreneurs are explored in broad terms.

  
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    BUS 325 - Organizational Project Management, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 305 
    This course prepares students for the needs of work environments that are increasing project based. The course builds skills that allow managers to plan, organize, direct and control resources to achieve a specific objective. Managers working with large complex projects systematically break them down until they become a series of manageable tasks. Keeping these tasks occurring on schedule and within budget is the Project Managers’ role.

  
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    BUS 326 - Legal Environment of Organizations, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 30 credit hours
    Substantive private law, business associations, labor-management agreements, government regulations, and international law as they affect American business policies, practices and ethics are covered in this course.

  
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    BUS 328 - Business Law, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 326 
    This course is a study of the law applicable to commercial transactions, property, debtor and creditor relationships as well as wills and trusts. It is recommended for the accounting major.

  
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    BUS 329 - Business Ethics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore status and one completed BUS course
    Business ethics provides an examination of moral problems facing organization managers with a focus on learning how to integrate ethical thinking with strategic thinking in shaping actions. Students analyze actual case problems, learning to use various ethical theories as a guide to clear thinking.

  
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    BUS 330 - Introduction to Marketing, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ECN 100  or ECN 201 
    Marketing involves understanding the changing wants of individuals and organizations, the development and distribution of goods and services to meet those wants, and the maintenance of satisfactory customer relationships. It includes all the activities necessary to get goods and services from the producer to the consumer. This course gives students an opportunity to participate in an analysis of marketing strategies and the evaluation and control of marketing programs.

  
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    BUS 331 - Services Marketing, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 330 
    This course compares marketing of intangible services versus tangible products and how service characteristics affect marketing strategy. Students will learn to dissect services and service experiences, evaluate service delivery systems, and understand the role of service providers and customers. Students will explore service marketing concepts, theory, frameworks, and models to improve service development, service delivery, and service marketing strategies.

  
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    BUS 332 - B2B Marketing, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 330 
    This course provides an introduction to business to business (B2B) marketing, as well as an understanding of the marketing issues businesses face when their customers are other businesses – as distinguished from business to consumer (B2C) marketing for personal consumption. The emphasis will be on marketing management and decision making as it relates specifically to B2B marketing – including (but are not limited to) types of organizations as industrial customers, buying centers, segmentation, industrial selling, high technology developments, and ethics.

  
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    BUS 333 - Advertising Management, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 330 
    Advertising is studied as an integral part of our economic and social systems, and as a tool that has a direct impact on the manufacture, distribution, marketing and sale of tangible and intangible goods. Concepts and strategies include target markets, media selection, sales promotions, budgeting and evaluation techniques. Through case studies, students will receive hands on experience in developing an advertising campaign. Exposure to professionals in the field is provided by tours and lectures.

  
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    BUS 334 - Salesmanship & Sales Management, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 330 
    This course covers the practical aspects of the sales function and the job of the sales manager. Students will be given the opportunity to develop and demonstrate the skills, knowledge, attitudes and understanding necessary for the successful salesperson or sales manager.

  
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    BUS 336 - Brand Management, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 330 
    This course will provide students with an appreciation of the role of branding and will augment students’ ability to think creatively and critically about the strategies and tactics involved in building, leveraging, defending, and sustaining brands.

  
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    BUS 337 - E-marketing, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 330 
    Students will develop e-marketing strategies to understand how the Internet impacts a firm’s product, marketing communications messages, customer acquisition and retention, advertising, selling, distribution, and branding. Students will explore e-business models, segmentation, social media marketing, blogs, search engine marketing, email marketing, mobile marketing, Web site design, e-crm (e-customer relationship management), and e-marketing analytics.

  
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    BUS 338 - Consumer Behavior, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 330 
    What makes people do what they do? What makes people buy? What makes people buy from one company rather than another? This course will look at the nature of the purchase decision process. Theories, concepts, research methods and findings are explored and examined for use in marketing management decision-making.

  
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    BUS 340 - Biomimicry- Naturally Inspired Innovation, 3 credit hours


    Biomimicry is an emerging field that is encouraging scientists, engineers, social scientists, and inventors to look more closely at nature’s way of doing things as more sustainable than our human way. Nature has a rich and largely unexplored library of technologies that process and manage information, materials and energy. Students will both engage in the process of investigation as well as learn about opportunities for applications in various professional and vocational fields, thus broadening their carrier choices and desires. Students will have unique opportunity to learn and experience how biomimicry inspires and makes changes to various human activities and disciplines: business or organizational managers, architects, engineers, automotive and airplane industry, sustainable energy designers, biologists, entrepreneurs, builders and policy makers. Biomimicry is inspiring these various fields and societies to be more responsible and resilient, and to find and apply solutions to old and new problems in a more sustainable way.

  
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    BUS 341 - Behavioral Finance, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Junior Standing
    Behavioral finance is an approach to understanding financial phenomena that models decision-makers as less than perfectly rational actors. In trying to understand the specific ways in which behavior departs from full rationality, behavioral finance incorporates important findings from other social sciences, such as psychology, sociology, and economics. This course overviews traditional financial theory, considers perceived irrationalities in decisions and markets, and explores the social and psychological underpinnings of decision flaws. 

  
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    BUS 342 - Corporate & Organizational Finance, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ACC 211  
    This course is a study of the sources and uses of funds within an organization, the returns and risks related to an organization’s working capital and capital budgeting decisions.

  
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    BUS 350 - Green Business, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 30 credit hours
    This course introduces the student to the new and rapidly growing field of corporate sustainability.  Topics will include global ecological trends compelling the need for sustainable business, the “triple bottom line”, total lifecycle analysis, green products and ecological design, sustainable supply chain analysis, long-term strategy, growing public, customer, government, and industry demands made on companies to heighten their levels of sustainability performance, and the ethical motivations that organizations can adopt for “green” performance .  Case studies will focus on successful sustainability initiatives across a wide array of industries and organizational contexts as well as enduring challenges faced by businesses that aim toward sustainability.

  
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    BUS 351I - Global Strategies, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 310I 
    This course challenges the student to understand management of a multinational organization operating in a variety of national and cultural contexts. Strategic and tactical concepts will provide a framework for examining how organizations deal with the complex global environment.

  
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    BUS 352 - International Logistics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 310I  
    This course provides students with an in-depth coverage of issues dealing with the international transportation of goods and the exchange of international trade documents: transportation choices, international insurance, import processes, and international payment alternatives.

  
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    BUS 357 - Introduction to American Health Care, 3 credit hours


    This course explores the history, evolution and current state of health services delivery in the United States. The course provides an overview of the various healthcare stakeholders and their impact on cost, quality and access to care. This course also reviews the overall trends in healthcare including the current and future role of technology. Finally, this course provides an overview of career opportunities in healthcare.

  
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    BUS 358 - Business Communications, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 131  and Sophomore Status
    This writing intensive course is designed to provide a practical application of business communication skills. Students will learn how to effectively communicate with various audiences. Competency will be developed in oral and written communication. Development of these skills is integrated with the use of technology.

  
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    BUS 359 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    BUS 360I - Political & Social Responsibility of Multinational Corporation, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 310I  
    This course examines the role of power and ethics in the conduct of international business. Actual cases are studied that demonstrate some of the dilemmas faced by the multinational corporation and the growing concern with integrating the ethical and social concerns with business actions in a way that is beneficial to both business and society.

  
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    BUS 363(H) - Seminar, 1-3 credit hours


    Junior-level seminars are open to juniors and seniors who have completed listed pre-requisites. Seminars study advanced contemporary business topics and may be taken more than once, provided that the subjects are different.

  
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    BUS 365 - Introduction to Business Analytics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): MTH 121 , CSC 141 , ECN 279  
    This course provides an introduction to the field of business analytics, which is defined as the use of data, statistical and quantitative analysis, exploratory and predictive models, and prescriptive analysis to drive corporate decisions and actions.  The course starts off with a discussion of models to summarize, visualize and understand data.  We use that selected data to build a sample of models to make decisions.  The course takes additional steps to build smart models designed to make optimal decisions. The course uses Microsoft Excel Add-ins to expose students to the concepts and use of Data Mining (scuffle thru large amount of data to pull out useful information), and Optimization Models.

  
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    BUS 367 - Health Care Law and Ethics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 357  or Legal Studies Minor  
    This course focuses on the exploration of the ethical and legal aspects of contemporary issues concerning healthcare delivery. The potential interaction and conflicts among individual value/moral systems, ethical standards, legal and regulatory considerations are examined. This course will provide a working knowledge of health law enabling students to deal with common legal, regulatory, ethical and practical problems facing the industry.

  
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    BUS 377 - Health Care Finance, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 357  
    This course examines the economic and regulatory environment as it affects health care organizations and provides a general economic framework for understanding public and private funding of healthcare in the U.S. This course also explores the trends in third-party funding as well as approaches to best manage this funding. Finally, this course compares the U.S. health care system to that of other countries; the emphasis of this comparison will be placed on funding and cost control as well as its impact on quality and access to care.

  
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    BUS 405 - Leadership Excellence, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 305 
    Leadership is a dynamic and changing process encompassing a number of practical and theoretical constructs that are applicable to today’s rapidly changing environment. This course explores various leadership dimensions as applied to power, influence, motivation, satisfaction, groups, teams, and change, to name a few. The course also studies leaders and leadership theories for the purpose of developing and shaping one’s personal concept of leadership, and the application of various leadership approaches to different contexts. Additionally, not only will students explore leadership domestically, but also will engage in exploring global leadership and its application to different national settings.

  
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    BUS 406I - International Organizational Behavior and Management, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 305 . Students may not receive credit for both BUS 409D  and BUS 406I
    The course is designed to provide the student with theories and skills for understanding international organizational behavior. The individual, the project team, and the organization are the basic units of study and effective interpersonal behavior is presented as one of the most important factors in organizational change as it relates to various international contexts. Topics covered in this course include organizational & national culture differences, ethics & social responsibility, negotiation and conflict resolution, motivation, international human resource management, leadership and approaches to organizational change, to name a few.

  
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    BUS 409D - Behavioral Theories of Management, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 305 . Students may not receive credit for both BUS 409D and BUS 406I 
    This course is designed to provide the student with a behavioral science approach to organizations. Students will learn why we behave as we do in organizations and groups. The course will help the student understand how individual awareness effects performance as a manager and leader. Individual, group, and organizational differences and similarities are highlighted throughout the course. Students will begin to develop the interpersonal skills needed to be effective employees, managers, and leaders and improve the performance of organizations.

  
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    BUS 410 - Human Resource Management, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 305 
    This course provides an overview of the various functions in the field of Human Resource Management. The functions of planning, selecting, compensating, appraising, training, and development are covered. Legislation and laws pertaining to these functions as well labor relations and health and safety are examined. Overall organizational strategy is incorporated into the application of all Human Resource functions.

  
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    BUS 411 - Compensation, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 410  or permission of instructor
    Theory and strategy behind organizational compensation practices are examined. Specifically, the behavioral aspects of compensation, the legal constraints, development of base pay systems, variable pay, executive compensation, benefits, and services are covered. Students become familiar with actual practices and application in organizations.

 

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