2018-2019 University Catalog 
    
    Oct 20, 2020  
2018-2019 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Business Administration

  
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    BUS 412 - Employment Law, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 410  or POL 207  
    This course is a review of the historical foundations of Employment Law and Labor Law with a focus on current issues as reflected by recent agency and court rulings. Students learn about employee rights and relevant management practices to comply with Federal employment and labor laws.

  
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    BUS 413 - Staffing and Development, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 410  or permission of instructor
    This course provides a strategic overview of the Human Resource Planning function. Job analysis, recruiting, selection, training, development, retention, and appraisal are covered as key topical areas with a focus on the theoretical foundations and application of current practices.

  
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    BUS 415X - Entrepreneurship Capstone Experience, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 215 
    Corequisite(s): BUS 315  
    In this capstone course, entrepreneurship students will complete an immersion into an entrepreneurial experience. Students will have the option of pursuing one of two paths depending on their personal interests: 1) develop a comprehensive business plan for a new venture idea, or 2) working with an external new venture to develop and refine the organization’s business plan.

  
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    BUS 431 - Supply Chain Management, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 305 , BUS 330 
    This course is designed to cover the essentials of supply chain management, from purchasing to delivery, and includes concepts of transportation, inventory management, supplier selection, distribution, logistics and reverse logistics.

  
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    BUS 432 - Marketing Research & Information Systems, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 330 , ECN 279  
    The student will learn how to develop a marketing research project. An understanding of domestic and international marketing information needs and procedures will be covered. Students will be taken through the research process from purpose definition and proposal writing to final report writing and presentation. Data collection techniques will be offered to include current technologies and use of the internet.

  
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    BUS 436I - International Marketing, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 330 
    This course is a study of the peculiarities of marketing products and services overseas. An overview of the economic, political, cultural and infrastructure environments; determination of market size; use of segmentation variables; review of foreign buyer behavior; collection and analysis of foreign market research; determination of best method of entry; selection of optimum marketing strategies; and integration of all variables in a comprehensive marketing plan are covered.

  
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    BUS 444I - International Financial Management, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 342 
    This course is a study of foreign exchange markets, the management of foreign exchange exposure, multinational capital budgeting, international portfolio management, transfer pricing, multinational taxation, international securities, and interest rate risk management.

  
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    BUS 445 - Principles of Investments, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 342 , ECN 279 
    This course emphasizes techniques of security analysis, evaluation of portfolios and investment strategies including the use of derivatives.

  
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    BUS 446 - Intermediate Finance, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 342 , ECN 279 
    This advanced course covers selected topics in financial management such as financial analysis, forecasting, working capital management, capital budgeting, long-term financing, cost of capital and dividend policies.

  
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    BUS 447 - Financial Modeling Capstone, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 365  and BUS 446  
    This course is a hands-on, application-oriented tour of financial models used in corporate finance, investment analysis, and portfolio management.  The course is designed to acquaint students the building of financial spreadsheet models and analyze financial decisions quantitative and graphically.  The topics covered include but are not limited to asset return calculations, portfolio theory, the capital asset pricing model, option pricing models, bond pricing, equity valuation, LBOs and investment performance analysis. MS Excel is the primary tool to implement these financial models, however the course will also make use of statistics and probability.  The purpose of this course is to provide participants with tools to assist them in making and supporting financial management decisions. In terms of subject matter, students should be comfortable with equity and fixed-income derivatives, portfolio math, reading financial statements, free cash flow projections, and cost of capital calculations such as WACC.

  
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    BUS 451 - Management Strategy & Policy, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all required business administration courses.
    This is the capstone course of the business major. Students learn to research and formulate top level strategic goals which enable the firm to adapt and grow with its changing environment. Students also learn how to implement strategic goals by integrating the functions learned in lower level courses. Real world case examples are used to apply the learnings.

  
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    BUS 454 - Organizational Leadership Capstone, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 213 , 305 326  or 329 , 330 405 , 409D  or 406I , ECN 100 , MTH 121 , PSY 100 , 320 , CAS 112 , CSC 141  
    This capstone experience of the Organizational Leadership major is designed to synthesize current & previous coursework, practical work experience and theoretical concepts on leadership and systems thinking. It will stress both long-standing leadership paradigms as well as contemporary studies in leadership. The course will emphasize, develop, and identify the concept of personal leadership.

  
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    BUS 459 - Faculty-student Collaboration, Credit hours to be arranged


  
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    BUS 461H - Consulting Proposal Development, 4 credit hours


    Open to students formally accepted into Business Honors, University Honors students who elect these course to satisfy upper level requirements, and business students with Business Honors Director approval.

  
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    BUS 463 - Seminar, 1-4 credit hours


    Upper level seminars are open to juniors and seniors who have completed listed prerequisites. Seminars study advanced current business topics and may be taken more that once for credit provided the topic or subject area is different.

  
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    BUS 465 - Risk Management in Financial Institutions, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 342 , ECN 279 
    The course examines various types of financial institutions (banks, investment companies, insurance companies, etc.), the risks (credit risk, market risk, interest rate risk, etc.) inherent in the assets and liabilities of those institutions, and the tools and techniques available for measuring and managing those risks including portfolio diversification, duration, Value at Risk models, and RAROC. Note: This course satisfies the CPA Exam’s requirements for “other business courses” but does not satisfy any portion of the “accounting hours” requirement.

  
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    BUS 487 - Problem Solving and Applied Health Care Management, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all required health care major courses
    This course focuses on the investigation and study of problem solving and effective decision making within the dynamics of current health care organizations. This course also stresses problem identification, problem analysis, making decisions and recommendations and implementing solutions, and comparing results to a plan. The case method approach is used; management memos and senior research papers that incorporate critical thinking, quantitative analysis, conceptual and technical data analysis, and a formal presentation, are required.

  
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    BUS 495 - Innovation & Entrepreneurship Capstone Seminar, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 215 , BUS 315 , declared INEN major
    BUS 495 is a three credit capstone course for the Innovation and Entrepreneurship major, designed to give students an opportunity to synthesize the experiences and coursework of their first major and the Innovation and Entrepreneurship major into examples of developed conceptual and analytical skills needed by higher level managers in an innovative or entrepreneurial organization. The course will be team taught, involving faculty from the School of Business and from another division/school of the University who have been active participants in the Center for Innovation and Growth Faculty Fellows program. This course should be taken directly following or concurrently with BUS 415X - Entrepreneurship Capstone Experience, 3 credit hours . Students will engage in reflection about their experiences in the INENT major; will conduct an ‘innovation audit’ of an existing company; and will develop and present to an external audience a ‘innovation and entrepreneurship plan’ for an existing or hypothetical organization. The last two projects are intended for students to use as examples of their skills and mindset to present to potential employers, venture capitalists, and/or graduate school admissions committees.

  
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    BUS 496 - Industrial and Organizational Capstone Project, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 410  or PSY 280 
    The capstone course will require students to apply learning from coursework in the Major to a project with an outside profit or non-profit organization.  Students will learn the consultative process and develop and utilize skills in marketing ideas, influencing decision-makers, and interacting with various organizational constituencies.  Students will implement business and behavioral science research knowledge and skills in order to address and solve organizational needs and problems. The capstone requires extensive oral and written communication skills in order to complete an applied and/or research project. 

  
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    BUS 500A - Financial Accounting, 3 credit hours


    This course is designed to develop a working knowledge of the basic accounting system. The primary focus is on financial accounting and its effect on the business entity.

  
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    BUS 500Q - Quantitative Analysis, 3 credit hours


    This is a course for individuals who have limited skills in Excel, algebraic techniques or statistical analysis.  Students are exposed to statistical models and applications for quantitative methods in modern management.

  
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    BUS 501 - Systems Management & Organizational Theory, 3 credit hours


    The dynamic interplay of economic, technological, global and competitive forces, to name of few, affect small businesses, large corporations, government and society.  These varied organizations are challenged to achieve efficiency and effectiveness in this ever-changing arena.  In this course, students will learn to identify, interpret and utilize knowledge acquired in the areas of systems thinking, organization theory & design, and strategic awareness to deliberately design organizations that can successfully respond to these challenges.  This course pays special attention to the fit between the organization and its members with an internal emphasis on working together to achieve the organization’s vision while members achieve personal mastery. 

  
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    BUS 503 - Human Capital Management, 2 credit hours


    This course provides students with the concepts and applications to function as a leader in their organizations with the skills to cultivate, and maintain the effective relationship between individuals and the organizations.   Strategic human capital is viewed as a critical element of a successful organization that includes the process of developing and retaining employees to engage and achieve objectives, innovate, and maximize organizational and individual success. This course prepares students to ethically develop and maintain human capital while learning the best practices to do so.

  
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    BUS 504 - Negotiation & Conflict Management, 2 credit hours


    This course will develop student understanding of the principles, strategies, and tactics of effective negotiation and professional conflict management. Students will also increase awareness and understanding of ethical principles and stakeholder considerations that influence the choices offered and made in transactions and relationships.

  
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    BUS 505 - Leadership and Teams, 3 credit hours


    This course covers leadership & followership from an individual perspective, and allows for the self-exploration of each student’s leadership potential. Regarding leadership, it explores the characteristics of great leaders, and the degree to which leadership is inborn versus a product of personal growth and experience.  Team building is a critical function of management and leadership. The scope and focus is the study of group dynamics and team building theory with an experiential component.  It also involves a study of behavioral, conflict and leadership style and an analysis of organizational team functioning.

  
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    BUS 509 - Organizational Behavior, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 501  
    This course provides an analysis of behavioral science approaches to organizations stressing the implications of theoretical concepts on managerial practice. The course provides various approaches to viewing organizations, including the open systems model, principals of organizational behavior, community planning, constituency development, organizational change concepts, and the renewal process. Topics are examined at the levels of individual, group and organizational.  Additional topics emphasized include leadership, individual needs and organization requirements, group processes, motivation & job satisfaction, global management, communication, organizational change and development.

  
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    BUS 526 - Operations Analysis Models, 3 credit hours


    This course will utilize Excel to analyze models often seen in operational environments.  Students will learn how to break down, analyze, display and make recommendations based on large data sets.  Students will also explore forecasting techniques.  Other operational models and other topics may also be utilized including: PERT/CPM, Quality, Six Sigma, Lean, Inventory, Learning Curves, Queueing.

  
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    BUS 528 - Business Law, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 326  for Accounting 3/2 Program Students
    A study of law applicable to commercial transactions, property, debtor and creditor relationships as well as wills and trusts. Recommended for accounting emphasis.

  
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    BUS 529 - Business Ethics, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore status & one BUS course for Accounting 3/2 Program Students
    An examination of moral problems facing organization managers with a focus on learning how to integrate ethical thinking with strategic thinking. Students analyze actual case problems, learning to use various ethical theories as a guide to problem solving.

  
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    BUS 544 - Financial Management, 2 credit hours


    The course covers the basic concepts, tools, and techniques needed to make financial decisions.  The topics covered in this course will include, Financial Tools (Ratio Analysis, Time value of money – PV, FV, NPV, IRR, Payback, PI etc. in evaluating projects), Valuation of Securities and Projects (Fixed Income, equity), and Risk and Return.

  
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    BUS 546 - Intermediate Finance, 3 credit hours


    An advanced course covering selected topics in financial management such as financial analysis, forecasting, working capital management, capital budgeting, long-term financing, the cost of capital and dividend policies.

  
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    BUS 548 - Accounting for Managers, 3 credit hours


    This course is designed to enhance the manager’s ability to use relevant financial information to prepare effective managerial reports. Emphasis is placed on improving decision making abilities through the understanding of cost accounting systems applied to management models.

  
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    BUS 551 - Strategic Marketing, 3 credit hours


    This course focuses on the managerial decision-making process of market segmentation, targeting, positioning, branding, pricing, delivering customer value, customer relationship management, consumer behavior, marketing online, leveraging databases, return on marketing investment, and the ramifications of marketing decisions. The course examines how marketing has been transformed by globalization, hyper-competition, industry consolidation, and technology.  Students will develop both strategic and tactical marketing skills by working on real-world products/services using market research, segmentation approaches, international and product life cycle management, and financial analysis.

  
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    BUS 555 - Principles of Investments, 3 credit hours


    This course emphasizes techniques of security analysis, evaluation of portfolios and investment strategies including the use of derivatives.

  
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    BUS 558 - Business Communications, 3 credit hours


    A course designed to improve the students command of the English language in typical business writing, with analysis and writing of various types of business letters, and study of report writing, including collecting data, organization of material, writing style and various uses of reports in business and industry.

  
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    BUS 563 - Seminar, 3 credit hours


    This course will be offered as needed to cover topics of interest, e.g., Financial Statement Analysis, Fraud Examination, etc. It is also available to any student wanting to study an accounting or finance elective topic at a more advanced level or for studying an accounting or finance topic that is not currently offered in the curriculum. It may be taken more than once for credit provided the subject matter is different.

  
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    BUS 565 - Risk Management in Financial Institutions, 3 credit hours


    The course examines various types of financial institutions (banks, investment companies, insurance companies, etc.), the risks (credit risk, market risk, interest rate risk, etc.) inherent in the assets and liabilities of those institutions, and the tools and techniques available for measuring and managing those risks including portfolio diversification, duration, Value at Risk models, and RAROC. Note: This course satisfies the CPA Exam’s requirements for “other business courses” but does not satisfy any portion of the “accounting hours” requirement.

  
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    BUS 581 - Managerial Economics, 3 credit hours


    This course presents an introduction to economic issues relevant to modern day managers. The course coverage includes a range of both microeconomic and macroeconomic subjects. The course allows students to apply microeconomic theory to firm management, and learn how to use microeconomics to enhance decision making. Further, the course introduces students to macroeconomic indicators and their importance to business performance. Topics covered include demand and supply analysis, consumer theory, market price and output, production, cost, simple competitive market equilibrium, simple monopoly pricing and output determination, price discrimination, and bundling for the microeconomics portion of the course.  The macroeconomics section will cover unemployment, inflation, monetary and fiscal policy, economic growth, the causes and consequences of recessions, and issues in global economics.

  
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    BUS 590 - Corporate Citizenship in a Globalized Economy, 2 credit hours


    This course explores complex ethical challenges and responsibilities related to the management of corporations in a globalized economy.  They include ethics within corporate culture, corporate citizenship, relationships to communities, cross-cultural awareness, and trends in sustainability.

  
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    BUS 591 - Global Business, 2 credit hours


    The course is designed to provide the student with an in-depth understanding of the various pragmatic components, or areas of discipline, that are associated with organizations contemplating, or who are currently involved in the international marketplace.  Today’s global economic and competitive environment dictates that organizations look beyond their traditional national markets in order to sustain growth and to capitalize on emerging opportunities.

  
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    BUS 591T - Global Business in China, 2 credit hours


    This course provides an introduction to the dynamic and complex issues involved with doing business in China.  Students will explore the complex processes causing rapid change and the pressing problems businesses face in China. Issues to be addressed will include rapid economic growth and development, environmental pollution, the hegemonic role of the government, and China’s emergent role in the global community.  The focus is primarily on the contemporary Chinese society, but reference to other countries, particularly the United States, will be made where appropriate.

  
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    BUS 611 - Compensation, 3 credit hours


    Theory and strategy behind organizational compensation practices are examined. Specifically, the behavioral aspects of compensation, the legal constraints, development of base pay systems, variable pay, executive compensation, benefits, and services are covered. Students become familiar with actual practices and application in organizations.

  
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    BUS 612 - Employment Law, 3 credit hours


    This course is an overview of the laws affecting the workplace in the United States and interpretation of them as reflected in agency and court rulings. Through a case study approach, the course will stress the practical application of the employment laws and rulings to Human Resource Administration.

  
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    BUS 613 - Staffing and Development, 3 credit hours


    This in-depth course explores the theory and practices involved in acquiring and developing an organization’s workforce. Topics include workforce planning, job analysis, assessment, recruiting, selection, training and development. Course explores these topical areas with a focus on practical application.

  
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    BUS 626 - Business Analytics I, 3 credit hours


    This course explores the computer models necessary to deal with the complex relationships making up an integrated system. Linear regression, forecasting/time series, linear programming, simulation, and probabilistic decision models are studied. The emphasis is on the description of common management problems in terms of these models, the solution of such models, and the analysis of the results for making decisions from a systems perspective.

  
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    BUS 627 - Business Analytics II, 3 credit hours


    This course expands the computer models necessary to deal with the complex relationships making up an integrated system. Logistic and non-linear regression, data visualization, K nearest neighbors and the use of specialized software are studied.  The emphasis is to perform analyses used in modern decision making.

  
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    BUS 628 - Applied Marketing Analytics, 3 credit hours


    This course encompasses the collection and analysis of information from the web, including web-based surveys, web analytics, online communities, blog scraping, and web spiders to support marketing strategy and performance.  Three areas will be examined:  Data visualization of complex data and models for discerning patterns using graphical representations; Network analysis of social media and mobile data for actionable strategic insights, and Website Analytics data mining for measurement of offline marketing, channel performance, and return on marketing investment.

  
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    BUS 630 - International Marketing Strategy, 3 credit hours


    Strategic marketing management approach to the marketing mix–product, price, promotion and distribution–within the international context.

  
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    BUS 635 - Intro to Entrepreneurship Strategy, Feasibility, Business Planning & Analysis, 3 credit hours


    Students will be exposed to the relationship of entrepreneurship and strategy, and sensitized to the fact that successful entrepreneurs are able to notice the possibilities that many other people miss and (more importantly) are able to find the means to turn these possibilities into action – bringing to market something new, novel and uses – inside a corporation or as a brand new venture. This course teaches how to structure the first outline business plan and explores the various forms ventures may take, including describing the company and registration. Students will learn that developing a business plan forces them to introduce discipline and thought process into all of their planning activities.

  
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    BUS 636 - Entrepreneurial Strategies for Sustaining Growth in the Established Company or Exiting, 3 credit hours


    This course will cover several topics that are important as ventures grow. These include the key areas of money management, profitability, bankruptcy, and the sensitive issues of “exiting” the company. In addition, the importance of revisiting strategy on a regular basis, revamping structure as warranted, building and maintain a strong culture, hiring and firing, will be discussed.

  
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    BUS 637 - Entrepreneurship Immersion, 3 credit hours


    Topics as identified.  Topics may include successful consultation, entrepreneurial finance, creation of new products, processes, ventures. 

  
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    BUS 644 - Financial Management II, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): BUS 544  
    This course builds upon the knowledge of Finance gained in Financial Management 1.  The goal of the course is to make a student more operational in the sense that the student is better trained to be in a position to do financial analysis.  The course is structured to provide greater depth on core issues of valuation, capital budgeting, capital structure, cost of capital, working capital management, and the workings of the foreign currency markets.   The course will draw upon learning the necessary theory and utilize mini cases to achieve the desired objective.  The topics covered by this course include:  In-depth review of financial tools e.g. Time of value of money, Project Evaluation (Capital budgeting techniques, Risk analysis), Long term Financial Decisions (Capital Structure), Short Term Financial Decisions (Working Capital Management), International finance (Foreign Exchange Market and Risk prevention).

  
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    BUS 645 - Project Management, 3 credit hours


    This course provides students with the basic knowledge in project management according to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide). It provides project managers with the fundamental practices needed to achieve organizational results and excellence in the practice of project management. The course is aligned with the current PMBOK® Guide  covering the following knowledge areas: Integration Management, Scope Management, Schedule Management, Cost Management, Procurement Management, Quality Management, Resource Management, Communication Management, Risk Management and Stakeholder Management.

  
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    BUS 650 - International Financial Management, 3 credit hours


    This course introduces the operation of international financial markets and risk management in the global environment to equip students with the skills to make financial decisions in the global market. 

  
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    BUS 652 - International Strategic Logistics, 3 credit hours


    This course is designed to give the students a working knowledge of the logistical challenges associated with international trade.  While a good portion of the course content will be quite pragmatic, the course will attempt to build a strategic framework for the logistical function in a multi-national company.

  
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    BUS 653 - Introduction to Sustainable Business, 3 credit hours


    Students will gain an understanding of how business professionals use sustainability principles as drivers for innovation and how to incorporate this strategic thinking into their own career paths. Students will learn how business decisions benefit from taking into account impacts of social and ecological capital. Topics will include the “Triple Bottom Line” approach as a catalyst for organizational innovation and corporate performance, and corporate motivations for engagement in sustainability. 

  
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    BUS 654 - Environmental Science and Regulation for Sustainable Business, 3 credit hours


    This course provides students with basic scientific knowledge essential for understanding the problems and potential solutions associated with human-induced environmental challenges, including a review of the scientific method, ecosystem structure and function, and an examination of environmental issues related to human population dynamics, energy production and consumption, climate change, land use, transportation, food resources, water resources, and waste generation & management.  The course also focuses on government regulatory environments (local to federal) that impact a firm’s sustainability behavior and performance. Students are challenged to think critically about the environment in which we live (local to global) and how it pertains to personal and professional decisions we make each day. 

  
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    BUS 655 - Applied Project, 1-3 credit hours


    The Applied Project is an individual project. Students will identify or select a project opportunity within a for profit business, not for profit business, or new business venture to apply coursework for this project. Students will conduct an in-depth analysis and then make recommendations and/or implement a solution to address a current organizational problem, enhance organizational effectiveness or competitiveness, or explore and evaluate new business opportunities.

  
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    BUS 657 - Managing Change, Creativity & Innovation, 3 credit hours


    This course will bring together comprehensive aspects of change management, creative problem solving, and organizational growth with systems thinking. The course will be designed to use relevant and timely case study materials, interviews, reflective questions, and hands-on experiential opportunities. Specific topic in the course will include (but not be limited to) The Process of Change, Creativity and Innovation; Growth in the Creative Economy and the Future of Organizations; The Individual – Promoting Critical Thinking; The Group – Nurturing Team Work; The Leader – Promoting New Ideas at Work; The Culture – Enabling and Constraining Creative Processes at Work; and the Organization – Managing Processes of Change.

  
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    BUS 662 - Greener and More Sustainable New Products & Services, 3 credit hours


    Evolving principles of sustainable management will be applied to the critical task of designing, producing, marketing, servicing, and disposing of sustainable products and services. The course will create a learning laboratory for developing sustainable products and services, examining historic, current, and future examples of sustainable products and services - with attention to evolving definitions of sustainable products. Life Cycle Analysis, assessment and management of product supply chains, creation of environmental product differentiation with benefits to the consumer will also be a major area of emphasis. The course introduces a new and emerging discipline of looking to nature as a model for more sustainable and innovation.  Biomimicry–the conscious emulation of life’s genius – is the basis for innovation inspired by nature, a new approach and mindset for creatively designing new and improved products and services. This class will explore past, present and future examples of biomimetic solutions to human problems. Lessons learned can then be used to improve on our own creative processes leading to a greener and more sustainable outcomes and inventions.

  
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    BUS 670 - Strategic Management, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): 30 credit hours
    This capstone course represents the culmination and integration of the student’s MBA coursework throughout the MBA program.  The art and science of strategic analysis, planning and development, implementation and execution, along with competitive assessment and overall enterprise management is the focus of the class. The student learns to apply the knowledge acquired in the classroom environment to a company that is a major player in its industry and/or in a simulated business strategy game. The competency gained will enable the student to formulate decisions based on rigorous analysis, and enable them to implement decisions, given the organization’s capabilities and limitations.

  
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    BUS 701 - Organizational Theory & The Systems Approach to Management, 3 credit hours


    This course introduces executives to the systems approach to management. It is an overview of the theories of general systems, systems-thinking, and the systems approach to management. Executives apply the systems approach to building systems models of the organizations represented in the class. These models provide an understanding of the interdependencies in a variety of complex organizations and help managers learn to make more effective decisions for their organizations.

  
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    BUS 702 - Organizational Theory & The Systems Approach to Management, 3 credit hours


    This course introduces healthcare executives to factors that challenge organization design and effectiveness.  It incorporates an overview of general systems theories, organizational theory, and healthcare dynamics (e.g. value-based healthcare, etc.), which are of central concern today. Executives apply the above approaches and build systemic models, which provide an understanding of the interrelationships and interdependencies in a variety of complex healthcare environments helping managers make effective decisions for their organizations.

  
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    BUS 705 - Accountability of Financial Resources, 3 credit hours


    This course emphasizes the use of the accounting system to provide decision-making information to the manager. Cost accounting data are applied to management models of the firm, especially those models dealing with alternative choice situations such as pricing, factor and product combinations and capital budgets. Financial principles and analysis are coupled with accounting data for specialized types of business situations requiring executive decisions. Case problems provide the basis for intensive study of the subject area.

  
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    BUS 706 - Accountability of Financial Resources, 3 credit hours


    This course emphasizes the use of the accounting system to provide decision-making information to the manager. Cost accounting data are applied to management models of the firm, especially those models dealing with alternative choice situations such as pricing, factor and product combinations and capital budgets. Financial principles and analysis are coupled with accounting data for specialized types of business situations requiring executive decisions. Case problems provide the basis for intensive study of the subject area.

  
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    BUS 709 - Micro–Organizational Behavior, 3 credit hours


    This course is designed to provide the manager with behavioral science approaches to organizations. It will stress the implications of theoretical concepts and their effect on managerial practice. Topics are examined at the levels of the individual, group and organization. A participative and experiential learning approach is used to examine topics such as leadership, teamwork, global management, communication & conflict management, individual personality, organizational change & development and strategic HR management. Special attention is given to current literature relating to the relevant OB topics and Health Care Management.

  
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    BUS 711 - Senior Management Issues, 3 credit hours


    An overview of contemporary issues confronting senior leaders in today’s highly competitive global business environment. Topics include business valuation, portfolio restructuring, strategic decision making, issues of sustainability, the role of boards of directors, corporate governance and other current issues.

  
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    BUS 712 - Applied Health Care Analytics, 3 credit hours


    Applied Health Care Analytics will investigate topics in Management Science such as Linear Programming Models, Regression Analysis Models, Monte Carlo Simulation Models and some Time Series Forecasting models with the sole objective of equipping Health Care professionals with skills to employ Data analytics tools to transform raw data into meaningful and useful information to help or aid in decision making process. Applied Health Care Analytics will also attempt to bridge the gap between Data Analytics and finance topics such as Financial Analysis, Cost Accounting and Managerial Accounting by assessing the business and financial implications of decisions made as a result of applying data analytics tools. In addition, Applied Health Care Analytics will also review and discuss Health Care specific case studies on Data analytics as well as invite Health Care Data Analytics experts to discuss specific areas of application and the benefits of Data Analytics in the health care industry.

  
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    BUS 742 - Micro-organizational Behavior, 3 credit hours


    This micro-perspective on organizational behavior deals with both the individual and small groups. Executives develop a basic conceptual understanding of the causes of behavior (theories of motivation, learning, perception, communication, personality and decision-making) and develop tools with which to change behavior. Research findings, supporting the hypotheses and relationships among personal and environmental causes and behavioral outcomes, are integral to the course. This course has a strong experiential base and a heavy emphasis on process.

  
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    BUS 746 - Financial Management, 3 credit hours


    Analysis of financial information is central to financial control, forecasting and decision making. It also is central to the evaluation of customers, competitors or merger candidates. This course gives executives insight into financial statement analysis, cash flow projections, capital budget evaluation, working capital management and the primary methods of financing the corporation. Various measures of risk and methods of assessing the risk-return trade-off are also presented.

  
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    BUS 747 - Operations Management, 3 credit hours


    This course develops a systems approach to the analysis of senior managerial operating problems. Computer, quantitative, and behavioral models are used to formulate operating decisions consistent with an organization’s competitive strategy.

  
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    BUS 748 - Financial Management, 3 credit hours


    Analysis of financial information is central to financial control, forecasting, and decision making. It also is central to the evaluation of managed care operations, competitors, or merger candidates. This course gives students insight into financial statement analysis, cash flow projections, capital budget evaluation, working capital management, and the primary methods of financing the corporation (both for-profit and not-for-profit models are emphasized). Various measures of risk and methods of assessing the risk-return trade-off are also presented. Examination of actual institutions is incorporated into the course.

  
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    BUS 749 - Operations Management, 3 credit hours


    This course develops a systems approach to the analysis of senior managerial operating problems. Computer, quantitative, and behavioral models are used to formulate operating decisions consistent with an organization’s competitive strategy.

  
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    BUS 758 - Health Care Law & Ethics, 3 credit hours


    This course covers major legal aspects and regulation of American health care institutions and medical practice, and ethical issues that arise in health care delivery. The emphasis will be on learning how to think critically by identifying legal issues in health care situations.

    The goal of this class is not for students to become experts in the law, but for students to be able to identify potential legal issues in their work. For instance, the goal is not for students to be able to perform a complicated Stark Law analysis, but instead for the student to be given tools for identifying when a Stark Law problem may exist is a certain scenario and to be able to know when to ask for legal assistance.

  
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    BUS 759 - Health Care Policy, 1 credit hour


    This course discusses the policy development process at the federal and state levels, reviews major health policy milestones and the current state of policy development. Comparisons are drawn to health policy/systems in other countries. An introduction to business and health law is provided including corporate structures, governance, liability and government regulatory compliance.

  
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    BUS 760 - The Marketing Environment, 3 credit hours


    An organization must deal with strategic and tactical issues on a domestic and global basis if it is to maintain an effective marketing organization. The course places special emphasis on the determination of longer term marketing strategy, the building of shorter term tactics, and the significance marketing has in the strategic direction of the firm. Emphasis is given to the examination of competitive operations and practical marketing problems confronting executives. Topics include target marketing, marketing research basics, branding, consumer behavior as well as advertising.

  
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    BUS 761 - The Marketing Environment, 3 credit hours


    An organization must deal with strategic and tactical issues on a domestic and global basis if it is to maintain an effective marketing organization. The course places special emphasis on the determination of longer term marketing strategy, the building of shorter term tactics, and the significance marketing has in the strategic direction of the firm. Emphasis is given to the examination of competitive operations and practical marketing problems confronting executives.  Topics include target marketing, marketing research basics, branding, consumer behavior as well as advertising.

  
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    BUS 765 - Strategic Leadership and Organizational Effectiveness, 1.5-3 credit hours


    The macro-perspective provides a broader view of organizational effectiveness by dealing with the organization’s major sub-units rather than individuals and small groups. This perspective deals with top management team behavior as well as with overall design and efficiency of the organization. The macro-route to organizational change includes design of individual roles and organizational structures, leadership, culture, climate, relationships among roles, and leading change. A field activity culminating in an organizational recommendation to support strategic change is a major focus of the course.

  
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    BUS 766 - Strategic Leadership and Organizational Effectiveness, 3 credit hours


    The macro-perspective provides a broader view of organizational effectiveness by dealing with the organization’s major sub-units rather than individuals and small groups. This perspective deals with top management team behavior as well as with overall design and efficiency of the organization.  The macro-route to organizational change includes design of individual roles and organizational structures, leadership, culture, climate, relationships among roles, and leading change. A field activity culminating in an organizational recommendation to support strategic change is a major focus of the course.

  
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    BUS 771 - The Economic System, 3 credit hours


    This course gives executives an understanding of how the US economy operates, so that they will understand the national economic environment in which their own firm operates both now and in the future. Descriptions are presented from an intuitive perspective rather than from a mathematical/theoretical perspective. Emphasis is placed on readily available sources of important data about the economy’s recent performance, on interpreting those data, and on obtaining and evaluating forecasts of the economy’s future performance. The forces influencing economic growth, interest rates, inflation, employment and living standards are studied. Government policies for influencing the economy are examined together with the organization of policy-making bodies and the motivations of policy makers.

  
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    BUS 772 - Health Economics, 3 credit hours


    The value of economics stems from its usefulness in making sense out of complex economic and social issues, including issues in healthcare. This course will use economics and integrated systems thinking to better understand the interrelationships between our healthcare stakeholders in order to foster a true shared vision that benefits the stakeholders and society as a whole. This course will also allow you to better understand the mechanisms of the health care delivery system within the broad social, political, and economic contexts. Finally, this course will use economics as a framework to better analyze public health policy.

  
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    BUS 781 - Global Management & Multinational Business Operations, 3 credit hours


    Globalization of US business is proceeding at an accelerating pace. Executives are introduced to techniques for managing this economic transformation both at home and abroad. The course reviews the development and current role of the multinational enterprise. Major features of international trade and the challenge of managing organizations across national borders are covered. Executives learn how to respond to international challenges by developing or critiquing international corporate strategies and operations.

  
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    BUS 800 - Power and Ethics in the Management of Organizations, 3 credit hours


    Leadership has to do with power and influence. Ethics is used by some companies to mean compliance with a set of rules. The Greek word for ethics translates to character, which is about choice rather than compliance. The focus of this course will be to integrate leadership (power) and ethics (from both character and compliance perspectives). The course will also apply a stakeholder model to explore the challenges of creating sustainable economic and social value.

  
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    BUS 801 - Applied Ethics in Health Care Management, 2 credit hours


    Ethics is the branch of philosophy that focuses on morality; Applied Ethics is the study of morality in our daily lives. This course provides an overview of health care leadership and biomedical ethics for health care institutions, medical practice, health care delivery, public policy, and society. The emphasis throughout the course is on how to think critically, applying basic knowledge of the topics to contemporary issues in health care and society.

  
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    BUS 870 - Policy Formulation and Strategic Management, 1.5-3 credit hours


    This capstone course represents the culmination of the executives’ two-year program. The science of strategic analysis and strategic management is taught along with competitive assessment, and strategic planning. The student learns what it’s like to be the CEO, by taking these skills, and applying this knowledge real time within an actual organization. In the process, the executive learns how to formulate decisions based on the analysis, and how to implement these decisions, given the organization’s capabilities and limitations. The executives develop a multi-year strategic blueprint for the company and make an executive presentation of the plan to the senior management of the organization.

  
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    BUS 871 - The Strategic Management of Health Care Organizations, 3 credit hours


    This capstone course represents the culmination of the executives two-year program.  The science of strategic analysis and strategic management is taught along with competitive assessment, and strategic planning.  The student learns what its like to be the CEO, by taking these skills, and applying this knowledge real time within an actual organization.  In the process, the executive learns how to formulate decisions based on the analysis, and how to implement these decisions, given the organizations capabilities and limitations.  The executives develop a multi-year strategic blueprint for the company and make an executive presentation of the plan to the senior management of the organization.


Chinese

  
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    CHI 101 - Elementary Chinese I, 4 credit hours


    Introduction to Chinese language and culture for students with no or little previous experience. Students learn about 100 characters to help them understand basic texts such as songs and poems. Use of videos and internet help the learners gain a better understanding of Chinese culture.

  
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    CHI 102 - Elementary Chinese II, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CHI 101  or equivalent
    This second course continues the introduction of simple Chinese characters. Students learn 100 more characters to help develop their reading and writing skills. Teaching of culture is an integral part of the course.

  
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    CHI 201 - Intermediate Chinese I, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CHI 102  or equivalent
    This third course continues building on the students’ previous Chinese knowledge by introducing new vocabulary, characters, grammar and usage. Students who complete this course should be able to initiate discussion on topics of daily life, understand more complicated sentences and write short compositions. Mandarin pronunciation is taught.

  
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    CHI 202 - Intermediate Chinese II, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CHI 201  or equivalent.
    This course begins the second volume of the textbook introducing additional characters with more complicated dialogue and sentence patterns with continued practice of Mandarin pronunciation. Students will read and discuss supplemental materials including Chinese proverbs and folk stories.


Chemistry

  
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    CHM 050 - Independent Study, 1-4 credit hours


  
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    CHM 070 - Internship, 1-12 credit hours


  
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    CHM 111 - General Chemistry I, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): Three years high school mathematics or equivalent. High school chemistry is highly recommended. CHM 111 is a prerequisite for CHM 112  
    An introduction to chemical principles including the electronic structure of atoms and molecules, chemical reactions, reaction and solution stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and gas laws.

  
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    CHM 112 - General Chemistry II, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CHM 111  
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent registration in CHM 115  required.
    Continuation of CHM 111 . Topics include chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, chemical thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.

  
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    CHM 115 - General Chemistry Lab, 1 credit hour


    Prerequisite(s): CHM 111  
    Corequisite(s): CHM 112  
    A one-semester laboratory companion course to General Chemistry. Experiments focus on techniques of chemical measurements and strategies for solving chemical problems in the laboratory.

  
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    CHM 120 - U.S. Chemical Industry, 3 credit hours


    This course, designed for non-chemistry majors with little to no science background, explores the U.S. Chemical Industry, including many products manufactured in various segments of the industry as well as environmental and human health effects of chemical use.

  
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    CHM 150 - Introductory Chemistry, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): High school mathematics through algebra
    An introduction to chemical principles that address topics required for a middle school science education major.

    A lab component is included in this course.
  
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    CHM 221 - Quantitative Analysis, 3 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CHM 112 , CHM 115  
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent registration in CHM 225  required.
    Introduction to chemical methods of quantitative analysis, including classical and volumetric, a discussion of error and uncertainty in measurements, and elementary statistics. Discussion also covers the underlying physical and chemical theories and laws with emphasis on chemical equilibrium.

  
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    CHM 225 - Quantitative Analysis Laboratory, 1 credit hour


    Corequisite(s): Concurrent registration in CHM 221  required.
    Introduction to classical techniques for analytical chemistry including titrations and use of volumetric glassware.

    Lab: One three-hour lab per week.
  
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    CHM 251 - Organic Chemistry I, 4 credit hours


    Prerequisite(s): CHM 112  and CHM 115  or permission of the instructor.
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent registration in CHM 255  required.
    Introduction to structure and bonding of organic molecules.  Organic reactions and reaction mechanisms, including acid-base, nucleophilic substitution, elimination, and electrophilic addition, will be studied with a focus on alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, and alcohols.

 

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